residential child care

The Food for Thought project was an ESRC funded project to explore the ways in which food is used symbolically by children, foster carers and residential staff. It looks at how food may stand for thoughts, beliefs and feelings and how these can be better understood and harnessed in the care of children.

The webiste contains training materials and tools for relfecting on food pratices.  The resources will:

Review that examines the evidence on models of adolescent care provision beyond the residential children’s home model. A 2012 report by the Education Select Committee found that the child protection system does not meet the needs of older children and recommended an urgent review of the support offered to this group (House of Commons Education Committee, 2012).

An online journal of the Scottish Institute for Residential Child Care (SIRCC).

Online publication for all those interested in the way children grow up and how they are nurtured. It welcomes contributions from parents, foster parents, residential child care workers in children’s homes, day care workers, social workers, teachers, youth workers, youth mentors, child therapists, social pedadogues, and educateurs, and all people who reflect on their own upbringing.

The journal is electronically archived at the British Library is not an academic publication though academic submissions are welcomed and considered for publication alongside all other submissions.

Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social care trusts in Northern Ireland have introduced ‘therapeutic approaches’ in a number of children’s homes, and in the regional secure units, with the aim of improving staff skills and outcomes for young people. This At a glance briefing summarises an evaluation of the approaches conducted between May 2010 and February 2012. The full details can be found in SCIE Report 58 (Macdonald et al, 2012). Summary published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Children and young people in care are some of the most vulnerable in society. A small but significant proportion of looked-after children across the UK are cared for in residential settings such as children's homes. Following a regional review of residential child care in 2007, the five health and social Care (HSC) Trusts in Northern Ireland introduced 'therapeutic approaches' in a number of children's homes and in the regional secure units. This report gives the results of an evaluation of these approaches. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in May 2012.

Film that shows how children's homes in Northern Ireland have introduced training in ‘therapeutic approaches' for their residential child care staff.

The approaches help staff to have a better understanding of how children's experiences affect them, to consider their emotional needs and foster resilience. It focuses on the experience of staff and young people at the Lakewood Secure Unit.

Short study which provides an insight into the nature of children’s residential homes, the characteristics and circumstances of the young people who live in them and on the short-term outcomes for these young people. It builds on our recent research for the Department for Education (DfE) 'Raising the Bar? An Evaluation of the Social Pedagogy Pilot Programme in Children’s Residential Homes'.

These elearning resources are freely available to all users and, through audio, video and interactive uses of technology, will provide the user with an engaging introduction to different residential care settings, the needs that children may have in care, young people's own concerns, interpreting and acting on children's behaviour, helping children meet the outcomes of 'Every child matters', key legislation and managing challenging behaviour. Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) e-learning resource published in 2008.