older peoples homes

The elderly are often described as a problem group. In this video, Michele Hanson visits Age Concern's Great Croft Resource Centre in Camden to find out how people feel about this.

Many experts, the public and the Government agree that the UK needs a new care funding system: evidence shows that the present system is unfair, unclear and unsustainable. This summary updates a Solutions produced in 2007, and suggests four costed, fairer and more sustainable methods of funding.

Briefing that examines the implications of the personalisation agenda for nursing homes.

A review of the issues around paying for long-term care for older people, asking how the current system could be improved. This study brings together evidence and discussions assembled by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. It identifies some key challenges that need addressing in order to start moving towards a fairer, more rational and adequate system of funding It deliberately avoids proposing a radical redesign of the whole system, though there is a case for that. Rather it provides a platform for sensible discussion of how to design improvements in the funding system.

This review by a team from the University of Warwick and University of the West of England, with support from the University of York, examines research evidence available to support improved care for older people in residential homes. The review explores seven themes: residents' and relatives' views on care; clinical areas for improvement; medication in care homes; medical input into care homes; nursing care in care homes; interface between care homes and other services; care improvement in care homes.

Staff in care homes for older people can be confused as to what constitutes restraint, and unsure how to balance their responsibilities to residents with the rights of residents to make their own decisions. This report is based on a selection of literature that addresses these questions, as well as considering how, when and why restraint is used.

This report details what the Care Commission found when it looked in detail at five areas of food and nutrition in a sample of 303 care homes for older people in Scotland during inspections in 2006 to 2007, investigated 91 complaints about eating, drinking and nutrition in 2006 to 2007, looked at the improvement notices that were served on care homes in 2008 to 2009, and worked with staff called nutrition champions to make improvements in eating, drinking and nutritional care in the care homes where they were working.

The report describes findings from a small-scale study commissioned by SCIE, which was undertaken as part of the My Home Life programme, a national programme aimed at supporting quality of life for those living, dying, visiting and working in care homes. The study seeks to shed light on the complexity of the issues facing care homes and to explore how managers and staff have developed strategies for avoiding or minimising the use of restraint.

Research concentrates on how falls in care homes might be prevented in an active way: in this, individualised falls/risk assessment forms an important part. But there is little agreement between studies on the interventions that work consistently well. The term "care homes" includes residential care homes, nursing homes and intermediate care facilities.

More than 40% of care homes in Scotland need to improve the support they offer people with life-limiting illnesses and those who require palliative and end of life care, according to a new report from Scotland’s care watchdog.

This report reflects the findings of 1036 inspections and three investigations carried out by the Care Commission at care homes for older people between April 2007 and March 2008.