multi-disciplinary services

This is a small group training exercise involving allocation of responsibilities to agencies involved in protecting children.

It should be completed with a large group plenary for discussion and ‘unpacking’ the issues which arise. It is best used in multi-agency training programmes.

Document that sets out a national framework of guidance on how all agencies and professionals should work together to promote children's welfare and protect them from abuse and neglect.

It is aimed at those who work in the health and education services, the police, social services, the probation service, and others whose work brings them into contact with children and families.

It is relevant to those working in the statutory, voluntary and independent sectors. It replaces the previous version of Working Together Under the Children Act 1989, which was published in 1991.

These guidelines are a revision of 'Drug Misuse and Dependence: Guidelines on Clinical Management' published in 1991. A comprehensive set of guidance is provided for doctors in the assessment, treatment and management of drug users and drug misuse.

This resource highlights key themes from the Research in Practice publication 'Professionalism, partnership and joined-up thinking: a research review of front-line working with children and families' by Nick Frost, Senior Lecturer at the University of Leeds. This resource provides a useful introduction to the book, which includes more detail about the evidence from which the themes noted here are drawn as well as full references, brief historical and conceptual context, and practice examples.

Policy document which sets out the government's objectives for social policy to improve the lives of Scottish people in collaboration with the public, private and voluntary sectors, local government and the UK Government.

The document sets out achievements and targets in the following: justice, education and lifelong learning, health and community care, environment, transport, drugs and finance.

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

This booklet, produced by Down's Syndrome Scotland, provides information for parents, carers, professionals and students about those professionals who provide health, education and social services and how they can help children with Down's Syndrome.