multi-disciplinary services

The 4 Nations Child Policy Network is a partnership between the National Children's Bureau, Children in Northern Ireland, Children in Scotland and Children in Wales. New and improved services enable users to access child policy information from the partner organisations. Through the sites, users will be able to find the national information they need more easily while retaining access to comparable information from the other jurisdictions through links between the sites.

This paper focuses on the services provided to young children (from pre-birth to 5) and their families.

It sets out a framework which draws together existing policies from across the Scottish Executive in this area – whether that is promoting childcare, health visitor support, preschool education or broader support for parenting skills.

It seeks to promote greater coherence between these executive policies to give better support to joined-up delivery on the ground.

This review is part of the government's response to the recommendations of the Hammond Report following the tragic death of a 3-year-old child, Kennedy McFarlane. The aim of the review is to promote the reduction of abuse or neglect of children, and to improve the services for children who experience abuse or neglect.

Tackling drug misuse in Scotland is one of the Scottish Executive’s key priorities. The Executive has adopted Tackling Drugs in Scotland: Action in Partnership as the forward drugs strategy for Scotland.

This plan sets out how the Executive will play its part in beating drugs in terms of young people, communities and treatment.

This report and its companion entitled Safeguarding Children in Whom Illness is Induced or Fabricated by Carers with Parenting Responsibilities, by the Department of Health, is essential reading for all paediatricians and other members of the multi-disciplinary team in the field of child protection. The Department of Health document sets out policy and guidelines for all professionals, whereas this document discusses clinical issues in more detail and provides practical advice for paediatricians.

The focus of this draft strategy is on identifying training and development activity required to support improvement in services to women and children who are experiencing domestic abuse, and to men who use violence.

It is based on increasing capacity to deliver training and providing national co-ordination of training on domestic abuse. This training strategy is set out in 6 sections: context, aims of the training strategy; requirements of the training strategy; taking the strategy forward; capacity building; and an action plan.

This report describes the findings and conclusions of an inter-disciplinary review of social work and health services in Scotland to support vulnerable families with young children aged 0-3 years. It also takes account of other important services such as early education and childcare, housing, health services for adults and Children’s Hearings.

This summary report maps the development of services funded through Sure Start Scotland based on information provided by local authorities. The mapping exercise was carried out by a team at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) commissioned by the Scottish Executive.

This guidance sets out how agencies and professionals should work together to protect children from abuse and neglect, and to safeguard and promote their welfare. It identifies the roles and tasks of different professionals and agencies involved in tackling child abuse and neglect, and it outlines the role of local Child Protection Committees.

Second annual report which sets out the progress made in 2002 across all 4 pillars of the Executive’s drugs strategy, namely, young people, communities, treatment and availability.