home care

Report to the Secretary of State on the Review of Elective Home Education in England

This review has been triggered by a range of issues and representations, not least being the quite proper concern to ensure that systems for keeping children safe and ensuring that they receive a suitable education are as robust as possible.

The review was conducted by means of structured interview with a range of stakeholders including home educating parents and children, visits to local authorities and home education groups, a public call for evidence and a questionnaire to all top tier local authorities in England.

Personalisation briefing: implications for personal assistants (At a glance 14)

This briefing examines the implications of the personalisation agenda for personal assistants. Personalisation means thinking about care and support services in an entirely different way. This means starting with the person as an individual with strengths, preferences and aspirations and putting them at the centre of the process of identifying their needs and making choices about how and when they are supported to live their lives. It requires a significant transformation of adult social care so that all systems, processes, staff and services are geared up to put people first.

SCIE consultation response: Independence, well-being and choice: Our vision for the future of social care for adults in England

SCIE’s response to the adult social care green paper, derived from our ever-increasing knowledge of adult social care services, gained from our extensive stakeholder collaboration and our commitment to user- and carer-defined outcomes. As the key organisation tasked with developing the knowledge base for social care, SCIE believes it is important to examine the implications of changes proposed in Independence, well-being and choice.

In safe hands: the protection of vulnerable adults from financial abuse in their own homes: update

In Safe hands was issued as Section 7 Guidance in 2000. This update addresses the gap in provision of guidance to promote good financial practice when supporting vulnerable people in their own homes. It covers: purpose of good practice guidance; underpinning principles; roles and responsibilities of the care co-ordinator, care provider and care worker; responsibility for monitoring of financial transactions. The appendix provides a summary of the Mental Capacity Act and examples of financial transaction recording documentation used in local authorities.

Home care services, Scotland, 2008

Statistical publication presenting national figures for home care services provided or purchased by local authorities in Scotland.

Personalisation briefing for home care providers

This briefing provides guidance for home care providers on how to meet the challenges posed by the personalisation agenda. It provides details of both opportunities and risks, and also highlights how personalisation will impact on organisations very differently, depending on their size, and whether they have relied on large-scale council contracts or on more self-funded customers. Short examples from practice are also included.

Response to the consultation on the review of the No Secrets guidance

JRF’s search to understand and improve the experiences of older people and disabled people in society is central to our work on social policy and practice. This publication is a response to the Department of Health’s consultation on the review of the No Secrets guidance.

SCIE research briefing 1: Preventing falls in care homes

Research concentrates on how falls in care homes might be prevented in an active way: in this, individualised falls/risk assessment forms an important part. But there is little agreement between studies on the interventions that work consistently well. The term "care homes" includes residential care homes, nursing homes and intermediate care facilities.

A review of free personal and nursing care

Report which evaluates the robustness of financial planning, monitoring and reporting arrangements for FPNC at both national and local level. It examines the costs and funding allocations for FPNC across all Scottish councils and identifies the financial impact of FPNC on older people, the Scottish Government and councils.