home care

This study aimed to provide robust evidence on the immediate and longer-term benefits of home care re-ablement, by comparing outcomes for users of home care re-ablement with outcomes for people using conventional home care services; identify factors affecting the level and duration of benefits for service users; estimate the unit costs of home care re-ablement services; identify impacts on and savings in the use of social care and other services that could offset the costs of re-ablement; and describe the content of home care re-ablement services.

This guide gives offers information about what telecare and telehealth is, how to get it and information to help people decide whether it is the right solution for them.

This report from the Alzheimer’s Society reveals that many people with dementia and carers receive insufficient support and care at home. It also found that the home care workers who responded regularly worked with people with dementia and understood that they could have a good quality of life. First published in January 2011.

This At a glance briefing examines the ethical issues which local strategies and protocols should reflect and which practitioners should think about when supporting people to use telecare services.

The purpose of this statistics release is to present the latest national figures for home care services provided or purchased by local authorities in Scotland. All local authorities in Scotland provide Home Care services which give people the support, practical help and personal care that they need to live as independently as possible in the community.

Care Services Efficiency Delivery (CSED) developed this toolkit to help councils looking to introduce a new homecare re-ablement service or extend or improve an existing service. It has been developed as a practical project support to councils and builds on extensive work done by CSED in compiling a body of evidence on how homecare re-ablement services are helping to appropriately reduce the level of ongoing homecare support required; and working actively with councils to identify successful approaches, learning points and best practice.

This briefing examines the implications of the personalisation agenda for personal assistants. Personalisation means thinking about care and support services in an entirely different way. This means starting with the person as an individual with strengths, preferences and aspirations and putting them at the centre of the process of identifying their needs and making choices about how and when they are supported to live their lives. It requires a significant transformation of adult social care so that all systems, processes, staff and services are geared up to put people first.

SCIE’s response to the adult social care green paper, derived from our ever-increasing knowledge of adult social care services, gained from our extensive stakeholder collaboration and our commitment to user- and carer-defined outcomes. As the key organisation tasked with developing the knowledge base for social care, SCIE believes it is important to examine the implications of changes proposed in Independence, well-being and choice.

Many experts, the public and the Government agree that the UK needs a new care funding system: evidence shows that the present system is unfair, unclear and unsustainable. This summary updates a Solutions produced in 2007, and suggests four costed, fairer and more sustainable methods of funding.