home care

This guide is about enabling people who want to die at home to do so and improving the quality of care they receive. In the context of this guide, ‘home’ means the place where a person usually lives. This includes ‘extra care’, sheltered housing accommodation and tenancy-based accommodation such as supported living, but not care homes. The guide is aimed at practitioners and managers supporting people with end of life care needs across the health, social care and housing sectors.

Report that looks at how far government and other organisations are making information about social care more easily available. It examines the challenges that organisations providing home care services face in responding to service users’ choices and the help that local authorities can give these organisations to meet such challenges.

It also reviews the available research evidence on how service users, carers and professionals balance the benefits of choice against the potential risks involved.

Report of an Inquiry to find out whether the human rights of older people wanting or receiving care in their ownhomes in England are fully promoted and protected. There has never been a systematic inquiry into the human rights of older people receiving or requiring home-based care and support.

Although far more older people receive home care than either residential or nursing care, the human rights of older people in residential and hospital care have received much more attention.

Statistics which present the latest national figures for Home Care Services provided or purchased by local authorities in Scotland. All local authorities in Scotland provide home care services which give people the support, practical help and personal care that they need to live as independently as possible in the community.

Report that provides evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and peer reviewed journals to show that increasing support for carers: improves health and wellbeing outcomes for patients and recipients of care; improves health and wellbeing outcomes for carers, who suffer disproportionately high levels of ill-health; reduces unwanted admissions, readmissions and delayed discharges in hospital settings; and reduces unwanted residential care admissions and length of stays.

Statistics release which presents the latest figures for free personal care (FPC) and free nursing care (FNC). The figures presented differ slightly from previous publications due to corrections being submitted during the validation process.

Paper that advocates a model for targeting health and social care provision in older old age called ‘Turnaround’.

Turnaround is advocated in the context of older population changes which make it imperative that authorities limit the need for high cost provision such as residential care and intensive home care support.

The approach would aim to develop provision that lessens the likelihood of admission to hospital or care, or demand for high intensity community provision, through a holistic approach which focuses on improvement, recovery and rehabilitation.

IRISS has published two reports commissioned from the Glasgow School of Social Work on evidence-informed performance improvement.

The first report, written by Robin Sen and Pam Green Lister, reviews the literature relevant to the National Performance Indicator on increasing the overall proportion of local authority areas receiving positive child inspection reports.

IRISS has published two reports commissioned from the Glasgow School of Social Work on evidence-informed performance improvement.

The first report, written by Robin Sen and Pam Green Lister, reviews the literature relevant to the National Performance Indicator on increasing the overall proportion of local authority areas receiving positive child inspection reports.

Two reports commissioned from the Glasgow School of Social Work on evidence-informed performance improvement.

The first report, written by Robin Sen and Pam Green Lister, reviews the literature relevant to the National Performance Indicator on increasing the overall proportion of local authority areas receiving positive child inspection reports.

The second, written by Gillian MacIntyre and Ailsa Stewart, relates to the Performance Indicator on increasing the proportion of older people aged 65 and over, with high levels of care needs who are cared for at home.