foster carers

This report was produced in 2002 by the Chapin Hall Center for Children, based at the University of Chicago. It provides data on patterns of employment and the levels of earnings of youths leaving foster care in the year they become eighteen. The study was concentrated on youth from Carolina and Illinois. Comparisons are made with other youths of similar age from low income families and with those who are reunited with their parents before they are eighteen.

Report inquiring into the age range of the foster care workforce in the UK to try to establish whether there are any immediate concerns for the future provision of foster care.

Resource containing a set of tools and resources to help partnerships concerned with the health of looked after children to carry out audits of services, formulate action plans and gather evidence of their progress.

Report that stresses how vital it is for the authorities to co-operate to help trafficked children get access to their rights and entitlements, as well as certainty about their immigration status, in order to move forward after escaping the exploitative situation. It aims to provide a wake-up call to teachers, social workers, third sector organisations and the police.

These standards were developed to improve the quality of care and service for those in foster care. The standards cover the following activities: recruiting, selecting, approving, training and supporting foster carers; matching children and young people with foster carers; supporting and monitoring foster carers; and the work of agency fostering panels and other approval panels. The standards do not apply to the services provided directly by foster carers themselves.

For a variety of reasons, some children and young people can’t live with their parents. When parents aren’t able to look after a child, the local authority has a legal responsibility to do so. It will find somewhere for the young person to live and someone to look after them. When this happens, the child is said to be “in care” or being “looked after”.

Publication reviewing examples of both innovative and established fostering practice in the UK with a view to encouraging all who work in the field to reflect on their own practice.

Report detailing the results of a survey of privately fostered children to see how well the rules and regulations governing private fostering are working out.

This publication is intended for everyone who is concerned with looked after children and young people and their families. This includes: elected members, local authority staff, staff in voluntary organisations, private providers, foster carers, health professionals and those involved in developing and improving children’s services.