community care

Annual report of the Richmond Fellowship Scotland, a charity providing community-based services for people who require support in their lives. The services work in person-centred ways to offer choice, promote inclusion and maximise ability.

This study assesses the need and demand within voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) for relevant, analysed and well-presented data to support their work tackling poverty. The poverty agenda has shifted away from ‘top-down’ action by central government towards the engagement of local voluntary and community organisations. As small, independent groups with their own ideas about tackling poverty, VCOs represent a powerful, ‘bottom-up’ approach.

This document was created to assist commissioners in developing commissioning plans that ensure that home care for people with dementia is appropriate to their needs (and/or the needs of their carers).

This report presents a number of contributions that relate to analysing communal wastewaters for drugs and their metabolic products in order to estimate their consumption in the community. This area of work is developing in a multidisciplinary fashion, involving scientists working in different research areas. For this reason, the contributions to this publication come from a variety of different perspectives including: analytical chemistry, physiology and biochemistry, sewage engineering, spatial epidemiology and statistics, and conventional drug epidemiology.

The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of how some care services were regulated prior to April 2002 (when a new non-departmental body, the Scottish Commission for the Regulation of Care (the Care Commission), assumed responsibility for regulating care services).

In particular, the review focuses on the nature of the evidence gathered and the standards applied. The research also identifies some challenges for the new process of regulation.

Paper that outlines the main community-based interventions that the Trust has evaluated and their impact, and identifies nine points that may help those designing, implementing and evaluating such interventions in future.

The paper could provide useful learning for the new health and social care integration ‘pioneer’ sites that will be appointed by the Department of Health by September 2013 (Department of Health, 2013).

This learning object is suitable especially for an opening module, as it provides an orientation into the subject and will stimulate debate on tricky legal and ethical issues. Introduction to Law sets out to make users aware of: the importance and relevance of Law; how interesting Law can be; the many ways that Law impacts upon our lives and work; the importance of Law to social work practice; and the connections between Law and social work values. 'Why Study Law' asks you to reflect upon how you see the Law through a 10 question quiz.