community care

The Our Health, Our Care, Our Say White Paper sets out a vision to provide people with good quality social care and NHS services in the communities where they live. NHS services are halfway through a 10 year plan to become more responsive to patient needs and prevent ill health by the promotion of healthy lifestyles. Social care services are also changing to give service users more independence, choice and control.

Leaflet on the Scottish Government website for service users about the National care standards for care homes for children and young people.

Care is a contentious policy concept. Numbers of people needing care are rising. Radical change is planned for care policy to increase choice and control through ‘personalisation’. A new conceptual framework is now needed to take forward policy and practice for the twenty-first century if people’s rights and needs are to be met.

This learning object focuses primarily on the later stages of dementia and on managing the more significant or prominent challenges - and symptoms - associated with this level of dementia. The material aims to reflect, where possible, the experiences of people with dementia and their family carers. Many of the examples given are located in a care home setting although the issues are also very relevant to supporting a person with dementia in the community. This resource contains both audio and video.

The JRF’s recent public consultation revealed a strong sense of unease about some of the changes shaping British society. This Viewpoint continues the discussion about modern ‘social evils’ on the theme of ‘distrusting and fearful society’. Shaun Bailey looks at relationships between individuals, the state and community, and the effects these relationships have on our daily lives that may lead us not to trust.

This report was published by the UK Department for Work and Pensions in March 2006. It includes a foreword by the Prime Minister, Tony Blair MP and the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, John Hutton MP. There is an introduction and conclusion but no executive summary. Main chapters are: targeted help for those who need it most; work as a route out of poverty; breaking the cycle of deprivation; delivering high-quality public services.

Paper summarising the policy literature and research concerning the ways, benefits and problems of involving patients in the planning of discharge to community or intermediate care.

This guide was developed to bring together relevant research evidence and practical experience of involving people, focusing on community care settings. It also aims to help practitioners to consider the most appropriate ways of involving the people they serve, to provide some practical guidance on getting started and to present examples of effective or innovative ways of involving people that could illustrate how an approach was used.

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This unit explores questions of access to community services, using a fictionalised case study of two long-term heroin addicts to illustrate practical questions, about how services can be accessed, and moral questions, about entitlement to resources when their problems can be regarded as at least in part self-inflicted.

This is a briefing on the Foundation’s Older Family Carers Initiative. The three-year Initiative has come up with a clear set of policy messages to help health and social care service providers to meet the needs of older family carers and their relative with a learning disability. The briefing makes recommendations for policy makers, commissioners, Learning Disability and Older People’s Partnership Boards and the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities.