community care

Multi-Agency Resource Service

Website resource that aims to support professionals and agencies working in child protection by developing communities of expertise and sharing practice knowledge across Scotland. Initially funded by Scottish Government, it aims to facilitate access to child care and protection expertise to help agencies deal with issues of neglect and abuse.

Agencies, councils or organisations can approach the MARS for help with specific cases or situations where a child death has occurred or there is concern about possible or substantiated injury or abuse.

What works: putting research into practice - mental health and employment

This video is taken from the What Works: Putting Research into Practice conference held in Edinburgh, Surgeons Hall on the 17th March 2010. It shows the interview of Miles Rinaldi on how inter-agency co-operation is crucial to the successful vocational rehabilitation of those with mental health problems.

Let me be me: a handbook for managers and staff working with disabled children and their families

This public sector improvement handbook was published in April 2003 by the Audit Commission for local authorities and the National Health Service in England and Wales. It "has been designed for managers and staff who work with disabled children and their families across different agencies and disciplines". It suggests the best way to improve services for disabled children is for all those concerned to work more closely together.

Care and support - a community responsibility? (summary report)

Any new settlement on long-term care and support must address the apportionment of responsibility for its delivery as well as its funding. With the state's capacity limited and family input likely to decline, the wider community must expect to play a growing role. This offers an opportunity to end social care's marginalisation, argues David Brindle.

Facing the cost of long-term care: Towards a sustainable funding system - Facing the cost of long-term care: Towards a sustainable funding system

A review of the issues around paying for long-term care for older people, asking how the current system could be improved. This study brings together evidence and discussions assembled by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. It identifies some key challenges that need addressing in order to start moving towards a fairer, more rational and adequate system of funding It deliberately avoids proposing a radical redesign of the whole system, though there is a case for that. Rather it provides a platform for sensible discussion of how to design improvements in the funding system.

Developing the use of 'MDS-RAI' reports for UK care homes

The MDS-RAI (Minimum Data Set Resident Assessment Instrument for Long Term Care Facilities) is designed to provide a comprehensive standard assessment of residents' needs for use in nursing and residential homes. This action research project explored how care home staff and management could raise care provision standards through embedding its use in daily practice.

Improving care in residential care homes: a literature review (summary report)

This review by a team from the University of Warwick and University of the West of England, with support from the University of York, examines research evidence available to support improved care for older people in residential homes. The review explores seven themes: residents' and relatives' views on care; clinical areas for improvement; medication in care homes; medical input into care homes; nursing care in care homes; interface between care homes and other services; care improvement in care homes.

More than my illness: delivering quality care for children with cancer

In 2005 NICE published guidance on 'Improving outcomes in children and young people with cancer'. CLIC Sargent suggested that a review into the community based care and support needed by children with cancer and their families was required to support the full implementation of the guidance.

The potential of migrant and refugee community organisations to influence policy

A report on a partnership set up to test how migrant and refugee community organisations could change policies and practices that are crucial to the lives of their communities. 'Change from Experience' addresses the ways in which migrant and community groups can use their own history and experience to develop the skills to bring about change. It challenges ideas about these organisations as ‘comfort zones’ and places them at the centre of debates about identity, gender, migration and cohesion.

What future for care? (summary report)

Care is a contentious policy concept. Numbers of people needing care are rising. Radical change is planned for care policy to increase choice and control through ‘personalisation’. A new conceptual framework is now needed to take forward policy and practice for the twenty-first century if people’s rights and needs are to be met.