child protection services

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. A school is concerned about the behaviour of a disabled child who receives monthly respite care.

This course is a mixture of didactic input and case scenario exercises. It also includes a PowerPoint presentation called 'A Multi Agency Understanding of Child Protection Related to Disability'. The course offers information on the current state of knowledge about the abuse of disabled children and the challenges of their adequate protection. There is then an opportunity for participants to make use of this knowledge using some brief case scenarios. Exercise can last approximately 2.5 hours and is appropriate for groups of 8-25.

Report that builds on existing knowledge about levels of running away. The estimated 100,000 children who run away each year in the UK are, to varying degrees, in need of support and services.

Although there is no single profile for a child who runs way, there are common services and approaches that can provide support before, during and after a running away incident. Stepping Up reviews these services and how far the current policy provisions ensure that every child who runs away is adequately safeguarded.

Valentine Scarlett, teaching fellow at University of Dundee explores innovative ways to support social work students meet Key Capabilities in Child Care and Protection. She describes her work with a range of pre qualifying students across disciplines to enhance their learning in child care and protection. By encouraging students to work collaboratively in this arena, she explains how joint approaches can be explored, assumptions questioned and potential future working relationships identified.

In 1996 the Scottish Office commissioned a complete revision of the existing guidance manual for Children's Panel members in order to bring it up to date, in particular for the new legislation. The Children (Scotland) Act 1995 was implemented in April 1997 and the Human Rights Act 1998 has since been introduced. Experience of working with the new legislation has brought about best practice guidelines.

Fife Child Protection Committee (CPC) Annual Report 2005 to 2006 and Annual Plan 2006-2007, illustrates the successes, the work underway and plans to build on continuous improvement in child protection.

The Kinship Care Practice Project conducts research, develops training materials, and provides educational opportunities to ensure safety, well-being, and permanent homes for children through collaborative work with extended families. This website provides the Curriculum Materials, which are intended to prepare child welfare caseworkers to engage family members of children in the custody of the child welfare system in development of a permanent plan for the child.

In the Borders there are an estimated 1,306 children and young people affected by substance misuse within the family. The Borders Drug & Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) has, over recent years, become increasingly aware of concerns around the impact of parental drug and alcohol misuse on children and young people. Assessing this problem has been a very complex process, and due to the varying levels of awareness and activity between agencies, has been impossible to determine exact numbers of children and families affected in this way.

Certain types of charity are set up to assist or care for those who are particularly vulnerable, perhaps because of their age, physical or mental ability or ill health.

Charity trustees are responsible for ensuring that those benefiting from, or working with, their charity are not harmed in any way through contact with it. They have a legal duty to act prudently and this means that they must take all reasonable steps within their power to ensure that this does not happen.