child protection services

Final report which sets out proposals for reform which, taken together, are intended to create the conditions that enable professionals to make the best judgments about the help to give to children, young people and families.

This involves moving from a system that has become over-bureaucratised and focused on compliance to one that values and develops professional expertise and is focused on the safety and welfare of children and young people.

The LARC3 research findings provide important "real time‟ evidence about the cost effectiveness of early intervention. At a time when there is increasing interest in promoting sector-led models of service improvement, the LARC model, in which local authorities and national agencies undertake collaborative research, has potential as one of the "improvement tools‟ available to local authorities and government.

Challenge question postcard published by the Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People’s Services in 2010. This downloadable postcard present challenge questions from C4EO’s research. The questions act as checklists to stimulate multi-agency thinking and help you develop your Child Poverty strategy and practice. There are questions for strategic leaders in children’s services, housing professionals, health professionals and frontline practitioners.

The Scottish Government is introducing a new membership scheme that will replace and improve upon the current disclosure arrangements for people who work with vulnerable groups.

Aims to provide practitioners with a concise and accessible summary of research relevant to the initial stages of assessment in children’s services. It revises and updates a previous NSPCC report: Assessing risk in child protection (Cleaver, Wattam, Cawson and Gordon, 1998).

A series of seven practice briefings that have been written to help practitioners and managers put 'Getting it right for every child' into practice in their agencies.

Local safeguarding children boards (LSCBs) have a statutory obligation to communicate and raise awareness of their activity as outlined in Working together to safeguard children: a guide to inter-agency working. This includes ensuring that partner organisations, such as statutory and independent agencies and employers, are aware of safeguarding arrangements. It is also important that members of the local community have an increased understanding of the work that is being carried out to help keep children safe.

Since the Scottish Office guidance, Protecting Children – A Shared Responsibility, was published in 1998, the child protection landscape in Scotland has developed considerably. New legislation, new areas of practice and new approaches have shaped activity at both national and local level.

This publication contains the latest statistics in relation to child protection, secure care accommodation and close support care accommodation.

Recording of Professor Kenneth Norrie, Professor of Law, University of Strathclyde speaking at the Fred Stone Memorial Conference, Glasgow, May 2010.