child protection services

A guide to protecting our children from abuse

This online guide suggests some simple steps that can be taken to make children safer, and to understand better how and why people sexually abuse children and how we can stop them.

It includes information on: who are the abusers?, how do abusers control children?, how do abusers keep children from telling?, what makes children vulnerable? and leaving children in the care of others; hints and tips; talking with your children; children out and about; and what to do if you suspect abuse.

Fear of the Unknown : addressing fears, myths, attitudes and values around child protection issues

The aim of this workshop is to dispel the fears of people who are relatively new to child protection issues, and those who feel it is a muddy area of legislation and uncomfortable procedures for themselves and the children and young people they work with.

The beauty of this workshop is it can be used for introduction to child protection issues or to update existing knowledge or beliefs. The exercise lasts between 1 to 3 hours and is suitable for groups of 3 to 20.

Children talking to ChildLine about loneliness

Report that is based on detailed analysis of calls to ChildLine about loneliness from April 2008 to March 2009.

Safeguarding children and young people from sexual exploitation: supplementary guidance to 'Working together to safeguard children'

This guidance sets out how organisations and individuals - including police, teachers, social workers and health workers - should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people from sexual exploitation.

It aims to help agencies to: develop local preventive strategies; identify those at risk of being sexually exploited, to safeguard those who are being sexually exploited; and to identify and prosecute perpetrators. A chapter on the roles and responsibilities of agencies is included.

Safeguarding children in Scotland who may have been trafficked

Scottish Government document providing guidance to all professionals and volunteers working or in contact with children suspected of being trafficked and intended to supplement local interagency child protection procedures.

Keeping children safe: what we all need to know to protect our children

Document offering information and advice on the nature of child abuse and how to recognise and prevent it. It highlights the signs to look out for in children and what to do if child abuse is suspected.

Protecting children from risk: NCH's view (2003)

To coincide with the publication of Lord Laming's report into the death of Victoria Climbie, NCH sets out our views on child protection and the future for children's services in England. NCH believes we must examine the whole range of children's services, not just the child protection system on its own because it does not exist in isolation in the real world.

Professionalism, partnership and joined-up thinking : a research review of front-line working with children and families

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.

World Cafe conversations: protecting children

The World Café employs a particular method for co-creating understanding. This is the outline and supporting materials for a half-day introduction to child protection.

The historical context of child abuse and protection

Brief power-point presentation that gives an overview of important points of historical reference in our understanding of and approach to children and their treatment.

It concludes with reference to two important current legislative and policy contexts – the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and The Children (Scotland) Act 1995.