child protection services

This case has been designed as a focus for learning about the legal, ethical and practice issues emerging from a child protection case scenario. As the case moves from allegations of abuse to planning for permanent care, learners can be asked to interpret and assess an unfolding scenario of complex need and to consider a variety of responses designed both to promote the welfare of the three children and ensure parents’ rights are actively considered.

Guidance for all practitioners including those working in: children and family social work; health; education; residential care; early years; youth services; youth justice; police; independent and third sector; and adult services who might be supporting parents with disabled children or involved in the transition between child and adult services.

Report that considers how well implementation of the recommendations of the review has progressed in the year since the review’s publication, and how the child protection landscape as a whole is changing. The overall conclusion of the report is that progress is moving in the right direction but that it needs to move faster. There are promising signs that some reforms are encouraging new ways of thinking and working and so improving services for children.

Guidance that is supplementary to, and should be read in conjunction with the Scottish Government 'National guidance for child protection in Scotland 2010'. The guidance outlines key definitions and concepts, specifically a definition of what constitutes child abuse and neglect and harm/significant harm.

Report based on the second in a series of annual reviews to gauge the scale of child neglect and monitor the effects of changes in national and local policy and practice.

An investigation into the relationship between professional practice, child protection and disability.

In March 2013 the Scottish Government appointed researchers from the University of Edinburgh/NSPCC Child Protection Research Centre and the University of Strathclyde, School of Social Work and Social Policy, to investigate the relationship between disabled children and child protection practice. Through interviews and focus groups, the researchers spoke with 61 professionals working on issues of disabled children and child protection in Scotland.

Little research has been done into what social workers do in everyday child protection practice. This paper outlines the broad findings from an ethnographic study of face-to-face encounters between social workers, children and families, especially on home visits.