access to services

This booklet, produced by the Mental Health Foundation, is for anyone who has become, or thinks they may become a carer for someone with dementia. This booklet explains some of the basic facts about dementia, gives ideas on where to get practical and emotional support, offers advice on how to plan for the future, and provides some tips on caring for people with dementia. Importantly, it also suggests some ways carers can look after themselves while they are caring. And finally, it recommends sources of further information and help.

This report deals with the concept of 'refuge' for children under the age of sixteen who are away from home or care, as established under section 51 of the Children's Act 1989 and section 38 of The Children's (Scotland) Act 1995. It discusses the factors affecting its provision in the UK and goes on to detail a series of pilot programmes, run between 2004-2006. These were funded by the Department of Health and the Department for Education and Skills, aimed to extend the models of community-based refuge.

Describes some creative ways of promoting personalisation to service users and practitioners. The four methods highlighted are: A board game called 'Whose shoes? - putting people first'; a website (shop4support) where people who use social care support services can choose them online; Social Care TV - to be launched by SCIE in October - which will include video about personalisation, and attending regional personalisation roadshows.

The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme provides cognitive behaviour therapy and other evidence-based therapies for those with mental health needs. This article looks at the progress so far, the increase in the number of referrals made and the role of low-intensity therapists in the services. A short case study is also included.

Report presenting the findings of a study which investigated the continuity of care experienced by prisoners before and after release. It also makes recommendations as to how continuity of care between prison and the community could be improved.

Sets out the results of a follow-up review of the 2005/06 national review of NHS adult community mental health services. Fifteen indicators were selected in the follow up review. National findings are presented showing the changes in trusts performance - improvement or deterioration - against each of the 15 indicators. The results are then discussed under three themes: access to appropriate care and treatment; involving people who use services; and recovery and social inclusion.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Right to Control is about disabled people having control over the support they need to live their lives. This consultation aims to look at the best way for disabled adults to access new services, such as individual budgets, which will give them more control over the services they are entitled to.

The consultation is the first step in designing trailblazer sites to find out the best way to deliver the Right to Control. Annexes include a summary of funding streams that could be included in Right to Control trailblazers, case studies and a glossary.

This reports on results of a national survey of fathers who have children with learning disabilities’. It presents the findings from 251 fathers who completed a questionnaire. It highlights that current policies and practices often fail to acknowledge or support fathers in their role as carers and make recommendations to address the situation.