approved mental health professionals

The MCA Code of Practice says that the IMCA safeguard is intended for ‘those people who have little or no network of support, such as close family or friends, who take an interest in their welfare or no one willing or able to be formally consulted in decision-making processes’ (10.74). It provides guidance about when an IMCA should be instructed in cases where a person has some contact with family or friends

This report is the final (Stage 5) report on the work undertaken by Skills for Care & Development as part of their Sector Skills Agreement (SSA) in Scotland. The purpose of this report is to set out the key findings and agreed solutions to the skills gaps identified in the sector as a result of the Sector Skills Agreement process. This agreement is therefore based on the skills demand and provision of supply work already conducted in stages 1 and 2 of the Sector Skills Agreement.

Report of a study which aimed to evaluate the implementation of the MHCT Act through an in-depth exploration of the experiences and perceptions of service users, carers and different health and social care professionals and advocacy workers, and a consideration of stakeholders' views in light of those expressed before implementation of the Act.

New horizons: public consultation on a new vision for mental health and well-being to help develop the promotion of mental health and well-being across the population, improve the quality and accessibility of services, and to enable SHAs to deliver their regional visions, in a way that reflects the changed nature of the NHS.

Paper describing some of the key ideas around recovery from mental health problems and looking at their implications for the delivery of mental health services. It aims to stimulate debate about how the recovery approach can be put into practice and what services need to do to make it happen.

Report advocating one hundred ways in which those working in the mental health sector can aid the recovery of people with mental health problems. In particular, it focuses on four key tasks, namely developing a positive identity, framing the mental health problem, self managing the mental health problem and developing valued social roles.

Report of a research project which aimed to provide a better understanding of the administrative workload of mental health workers. It sheds some light on the more complex questions about administrative processes and shows where small changes may make processes more effective.

This report focuses on the work of a small selection of people in Scotland to promote healthy eating among people with learning disabilities. The report will be of interest to those in the learning disability sector with a responsibility for, or interest in, food, health or training. It will also be of use to those who are involved in the delivery or promotion of the REHIS (Royal Environmental Health Institute of Scotland) Elementary Food and Health course, which this work was based on.