non-custodial sentences

Report presenting the early findings from the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey 2008/09. Included are estimates for the majority of questions contained in the survey questionnaire and some simple one-to-one relationships between survey variables.

Report intended for policy makers interested in prison and sentencing reform. It presents evidence about the situation in Scotland and ideas for future policy development in Scotland. These ideas are based on research presented by academics at a seminar on sentencing reform held 12 December 2008.

Report highlighting the part which sentencing has played in the increase in the prison population in Scotland and identifying factors which may discourage sentencers from using custody and encourage them to make use of alternatives to custodial sentences.

Report of the Bradley Inquiry into the extent to which offenders with mental health problems or learning disabilities in England could be diverted from prison to other services and the obstacles to such diversion. The report makes recommendations on the organisation of effective court liaison and diversion arrangements and the services required to support them.

The Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) of the Community Order can be given to offenders in England who have an identified mental health problem and have consented to receiving readily available treatment. This paper lays out what is known so far about the MHTR and further areas for investigation concerning its operation.

Report looking at the treatment of vulnerable defendants, both children and adults, in the criminal courts of England and Wales. It assesses existing provision for both groups of vulnerable defendants, identifies gaps in provision and makes recommendations to fill those gaps.

Report discussing how penal policy and sentencing can best contribute to reducing the prison population in Scotland while still maintaining public safety and suggesting some principles which would establish a presumption against the use of imprisonment as a means of punishment.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on electronic tagging. In the summer of 2005, the UK Home Secretary, David Blunkett, announced the expansion of tagging schemes for offenders which was predicted to lead to an increase in the number that are tagged and the introduction of satellite tagging.