research and evaluation

The National Drug Evidence Centre (NDEC, formerly Drug Misuse Research Unit) has long established expertise in drug misuse prevalence work, evaluative and outcomes research, the use of epidemiological indicators, and information in evidence based policy making. Senior staff are involved in national policy initiatives and in provision of advice regarding health care and criminal justice responses. NDEC is one of the leading units in the country engaged in research in the area of drug misuse.

Communication is a two-way process. Effective communication can improve the quality of life for a person with dementia. However, experts highlight that people with dementia lack the opportunity to talk and express their feelings about the quality of their own life and services they receive.

On 11 March 2009, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation hosted a symposium on Basic income, social justice and freedom, jointly organised with the University of York's School of Politics, Economics and Philosophy. Based on themes from the work of eminent political philosopher Philippe Van Parijs, it discussed his argument for the introduction of a basic income paid unconditionally, without work requirements or means tests.

This research set out to investigate the parenting beliefs and practices of fathers from 29 'ordinary' two-parent families living in non-affluent neighbourhoods from four ethnic groups: White British, Black African, Black Caribbean and Pakistani.

This research examines the effectiveness of drug education in Scottish Schools. The research consisted of a literature review, a survey of schools, classroom observations and qualitative research with young people and was commissioned in response to the School Drug Safety Team’s recommendation for research into the outcomes and process of educating young people on drug related issues. Research was conducted between February 2004 and July 2005.

This report begins with a summary giving the background; key findings; notes on childcare information; advice and assistance - the brokerage service; information about other services, facilities and publications; information on services for disabled children, children with special educational needs and for disabled parents; access to the information service; service delivery; changes made as a result of the extended information duty requirements; and barriers, ending with recommendations and notes on limitations of the research. The main text then pursues these themes in detail.

This pamphlet on commissioning research brings together papers from two Research in Practice seminars. Its central message is that research commissioned by child care agencies, including service evaluations, can bring clarity to children and family work provided certain considerations are borne in mind when planning and conducting studies and using the results. They include holding a sharp focus on the questions to be explored, choosing sympathetic, responsive researchers and having the skills to manage the contract.

The importance of employment and its links with mental health are summarised and the European policy context described. The report then asks what the consequences of poor mental health for economic activity are, if a trend in productivity losses over time can be seen and what we know about employment rates for people with mental health problems. Barriers to employment, the economic case for helping such people remain in the workforce, assessing the cost effectiveness of interventions to this end, legislative and policy actions, and the way forward are discussed.

DrugScope is the UK's leading independent centre of expertise on drugs. Their aim is to inform policy development and reduce drug-related risk. They provide quality drug information, promote effective responses to drug taking, undertake research at local, national and international levels, advise on policy-making, encourage informed debate and speak for their member organisations working on the ground. DrugScope is supported by a variety of organisations, including Government, EU, Trusts and Foundations.

This paper was written in response to the Hearts and Minds Agenda Group recommendation that research is conducted into the experiences of children of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) parents. This paper presents a review of the findings from eight papers identified by experts in the field and an internal literature search. It should be noted that these identified papers were predominantly focused on lesbian and gay parenting and not on parents identifying as bisexual or transgender.