research and evaluation

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on evidence based research. The government has been strongly committed to evidence-based policy and practice. It wants to use evidence of what works to inform and drive ambitious and innovative social programmes. Issues surrounding how evidence-based research is used and whether policy is based on evidence or informed by it.

Little is known about the influences of religious beliefs and practices on parenting adolescents. Yet religious beliefs and practices have the potential to profoundly influence many aspects of life, including approaches to parenting. This is particularly relevant with increasing diversity of religious affiliations in contemporary British society.

The first programme in the series looks at the American social psychologist Solomon Asch and his studies on conformity in the 1950s. Claudia Hammond investigates the reasons for conformity and asks whether we're more or less likely to conform today.

The authors, from Dorset Council, explain how they are trying to get the best out of the Integrated Children's System despite its limitations. The ICS was intended to enable a single consistent approach to case-based information gathering, case planning, case aggregation and case reviews. As such, the easily generated and clear reports would help social workers collect, organise, analyse and retrieve information.

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000 and set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s Syndrome) to lead full lives, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This report was produced by the Day Services Group, a subgroup of the National Implementation Group, which was set up to look at how day services in Scotland are putting the recommendations of The same as you? (SAY) into practice.

This research study was designed to examine the different factors that affect the work, savings and retirement decisions of ethnic minority groups. The aim of this qualitative research was to fill acknowledged gaps in existing research to ensure that policies are appropriate and sensitive to any cultural differences. The findings are based on depth interviews conducted with people from the six main ethnic minority groups in the UK (Indian, Pakistani, Black Caribbean, Black African, Bangladeshi and Chinese), including those below and above State Pension age.

This research into private fostering was commissioned by the DCSF and carried out by a team from the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) and the British Association for Adoption and Fostering (BAAF). The purpose of the research was to inform the DCSF Advisory Group on Private Fostering in making its recommendations to Ministers on increasing notifications of private fostering arrangements.

This resource was written for people with Alzheimer's Disease (AD), their family members, friends, and caregivers, and anyone else interested in AD.

Briefly reports on the findings of a study which aimed to evaluate the effect of a video decision support tool on the preferences for future medical care in older people if they develop advanced dementia, and the stability of those preferences after six weeks.

The Alzheimer's Society is the UK's leading care and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. They produce information and advice sheets to support those affected by dementia. Though no drug treatments can provide a cure for Alzheimer’s disease, drug treatments have been developed that can temporarily slow down the progression of symptoms in some people. Aricept, Exelon and Reminyl all work in a similar way and are known as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. There is also a newer drug, Ebixa, which works in a different way to the other three.