research and evaluation

The neglect of adolescents involves many aspects of their lives – for example, what happens within their families, particularly as they become young adults; their health and wellbeing; or their education. This means that working with young people who have been neglected inevitably involves more than one agency and the expertise of their staff. There is a need for both agencies and practitioners to work together.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned Ipsos MORI to carry out a research programme with the following objectives: to establish whether the social care sector in England is ready to maximise the use of elearning in terms of technical and organisational infrastructure and in terms of the availability of e-learning content for social care; to provide an assessment of the current capacity of the social care sector as a whole to use and produce e-learning, in particular in internet-based learning, and to exploit its full potential in pursuit of improved services for users

A key part of the Government’s alcohol harm reduction strategy is to monitor changes in drinking habits over time and to identify what factors are potentially contributing to the rising levels of consumption. This study is a systematic review of research relevant to trends in alcohol consumption over the last 20 to 30 years in the UK.

This report presents the findings from the evaluation of the Targeted Youth Support Pathfinders (TYSPs). The policy was developed by the Department for Children, Schools and Families to ensure that young people in need of support receive a genuinely personalised package of support, at the earliest possible opportunity. The evaluation was designed to capture the impact of the service reforms at the level of infrastructure, professional working practices, individual young people and overall outcomes.

The Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion is an independent, not for profit organisation dedicated to promoting social justice, social inclusion and tackling disadvantage. They work with the public sector, voluntary organisations, business and trade unions. They develop policy and strategy in a variety of fields and work closely with the Government to implement ideas. They also work with people delivering policy on the ground. This broad range of contacts lends a unique perspective to their work.

This research shows what effect policies introduced since 1997 have had on reducing poverty and inequality. It offers a considered assessment of impacts over a decade. The study covers a range of subjects, including public attitudes to poverty and inequality, children and early years, education, health, employment, pensions, and migrants. It measures the extent of progress and also considers future direction and pressures, particularly in the light of recession and an ageing society.

This document is for local authorities engaged in planning and delivering services to support older carers and summarises ILC -UK and the National Centre for Social Research's Living and caring?: an investigation of the experience of older carers. It gives key points, the background and the characteristics of care provision and discusses access to services, leisure, health, housing, and quality of life and care recipients.

Effective support for disabled parents is still rare, though many local authorities are beginning to recognise its importance. The National Family and Parenting Institute researched how supportive practice could be improved by talking to disabled parents and visiting four local authorities that are developing work in this area.

Over its 2 year duration, the Careers Scotland Enhanced Resource Pilot (ERP) project was evaluated, assessing the extent to which the provision impacted on the pupils who received the support and on the School Leaver Destination Return (SLDR) figures for each of the pilot schools.

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.