research and evaluation

Shyness (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on shyness. Susie Scott, Research Associate in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University, spent three years collecting personal stories and accounts of people who see themselves as shy, exploring the social context in which this feeling arises, how it affects our interaction with others, and the way that cultural norms and values shape our perceptions of 'shy' behaviour.

Young people, and gun and knife crime: a review of the evidence

This is the outcome of an extensive review of evidence about the effectiveness of interventions designed to tackle children and young people's involvement in gun and knife crime. It discusses predicting who is most likely to be involved in violent crime, the impact of where children and young people live on their involvement, how young people's relationships, perceptions and choices affect involvement, anti-gun and anti-knife interventions, and youth offending and youth violence research, ending with conclusions.

Disabled people's costs of living

It is well known that disabled people face additional costs to enable them to meet their needs. However, there has been no clear evidence about the true extent of these costs. This research, conducted by the Centre for Research in Social Policy with the support of Disability Alliance, presents budget standards for groups of disabled people who have different needs arising from physical or sensory impairments.

Neglect Matters - A multi-agency guide for professionals working together on behalf of teenagers

The neglect of adolescents involves many aspects of their lives – for example, what happens within their families, particularly as they become young adults; their health and wellbeing; or their education. This means that working with young people who have been neglected inevitably involves more than one agency and the expertise of their staff. There is a need for both agencies and practitioners to work together.

Drinking in the UK: An exploration of trends

A key part of the Government’s alcohol harm reduction strategy is to monitor changes in drinking habits over time and to identify what factors are potentially contributing to the rising levels of consumption. This study is a systematic review of research relevant to trends in alcohol consumption over the last 20 to 30 years in the UK.

Poverty, inequality and policy since 1997

This research shows what effect policies introduced since 1997 have had on reducing poverty and inequality. It offers a considered assessment of impacts over a decade. The study covers a range of subjects, including public attitudes to poverty and inequality, children and early years, education, health, employment, pensions, and migrants. It measures the extent of progress and also considers future direction and pressures, particularly in the light of recession and an ageing society.

Supporting disabled adults as parents

Effective support for disabled parents is still rare, though many local authorities are beginning to recognise its importance. The National Family and Parenting Institute researched how supportive practice could be improved by talking to disabled parents and visiting four local authorities that are developing work in this area.

Education and Lifelong Learning Research Findings No.50/2009 Evaluation of Careers Scotland Enhanced Resource Pilot Project

Over its 2 year duration, the Careers Scotland Enhanced Resource Pilot (ERP) project was evaluated, assessing the extent to which the provision impacted on the pupils who received the support and on the School Leaver Destination Return (SLDR) figures for each of the pilot schools.

Better Together: Scotland's Patient Experience Programme: Patient Priorities for Inpatient Care Report No. 5/2009

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.

National Forum on Drug Related Deaths in Scotland: Annual Report 2008-09

This is the second report from the National Forum on Drug-related Deaths. The drug death statistics published each year in the General Register of Scotland (GROS) report are fundamental to the work of the National Forum. This year the GROS report was more detailed than ever before. The report confirmed a disappointing but not unexpected trend.