research and evaluation

This report presents findings from a qualitative research project carried out as part of a wider evaluation of Jobcentre Plus Pathways to Work. The study was conducted in 2007 and 2008 to explore referral practices and liaison amongst Jobcentre Plus staff and service providers involved in helping incapacity benefits recipients move towards, and into, paid employment. The study was led by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York in collaboration with the Policy Studies Institute and the National Centre for Social Research.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on shyness. Susie Scott, Research Associate in the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University, spent three years collecting personal stories and accounts of people who see themselves as shy, exploring the social context in which this feeling arises, how it affects our interaction with others, and the way that cultural norms and values shape our perceptions of 'shy' behaviour.

This report on the consultation "Safe and secure homes for our most vulnerable children" accompanies Insight 30 and provides a robust analysis of all responses using both quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches.

This is one of a series of four ‘Sustaining Practice Learning’ reports commissioned by the Learning Resource Network on behalf of Skills for Care and the Children’s Workforce Development Council (CWDC). This research revisited fourteen projects that were first studied in 2006 as examples of innovative approaches to practice learning.

This is the outcome of an extensive review of evidence about the effectiveness of interventions designed to tackle children and young people's involvement in gun and knife crime. It discusses predicting who is most likely to be involved in violent crime, the impact of where children and young people live on their involvement, how young people's relationships, perceptions and choices affect involvement, anti-gun and anti-knife interventions, and youth offending and youth violence research, ending with conclusions.

This is one of a series of four 'Sustaining Practice Learning' reports commissioned by the Learning Resource Network on behalf of Skills for Care and the Children's Workforce Development Council (CWDC). This research provides a picture of the current situation for practice learning in 18 local authorities.

This report presents findings of a qualitative research project commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to investigate the relationship between mental health and employment. The research was conducted during 2007 by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York and the Institute for Employment Studies.

In the Borders there are an estimated 1,306 children and young people affected by substance misuse within the family. The Borders Drug & Alcohol Action Team (DAAT) has, over recent years, become increasingly aware of concerns around the impact of parental drug and alcohol misuse on children and young people. Assessing this problem has been a very complex process, and due to the varying levels of awareness and activity between agencies, has been impossible to determine exact numbers of children and families affected in this way.

This review of the available research will address the definition and extent of parental problem drinking; its impact across important dimensions of children’s lives; the impact on children as they become adults; and some messages for practice, including a suggested service specification. The research focus is mainly on UK studies published in the last two decades, supplemented by research from other countries, especially the USA, Australia and Europe.

It is well known that disabled people face additional costs to enable them to meet their needs. However, there has been no clear evidence about the true extent of these costs. This research, conducted by the Centre for Research in Social Policy with the support of Disability Alliance, presents budget standards for groups of disabled people who have different needs arising from physical or sensory impairments.