research and evaluation

The Good Childhood Inquiry was commissioned by the Children's Society and launched in 2006 "as the UK's first independent national inquiry into childhood. Its aims were to renew society's understanding of modern childhood and to inform, improve and inspire all our relationships with children." On 5th February 2009, the Children's Society launched the findings of the inquiry in the report entitled 'A Good Childhood: Searching for values in a competitive age'.

This review begins with a foreword stating that the publication in February 1999 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry report was a defining moment in police relations with black and minority ethnic groups. It then makes five key recommendations. An executive summary gives the background and outlines the broad structure of the report. Sections then put the inquiry into context, examine its recommendations theme by theme, and describe its recommendations on police culture, procedures and training.

The Institute of Race Relations (IRR) was established as an independent educational charity in 1958 to carry out research, publish and collect resources on race relations throughout the world. Since 1972, the IRR has concentrated on responding to the needs of Black people and making direct analyses of institutionalised racism in Britain and the rest of Europe. Today, the Institute of Race Relations is at the cutting edge of the research and analysis that informs the struggle for racial justice in Britain and internationally.

This learning object is one of a set of exercises and activities taken from the book 'Modern Social Work Practice' written by Mark Doel and Steven Shardlow. This chapter is designed to help students to reflect on the way they 'put their practice together' and to dispel the mystique associated with research and 'putting theory into practice'. It scrutinizes the processes which affect the practitioner's judgement in turning observations into action.

This study assesses the need and demand within voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) for relevant, analysed and well-presented data to support their work tackling poverty. The poverty agenda has shifted away from ‘top-down’ action by central government towards the engagement of local voluntary and community organisations. As small, independent groups with their own ideas about tackling poverty, VCOs represent a powerful, ‘bottom-up’ approach.

This study assesses the need and demand within voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) for relevant, analysed and well-presented data to support their work tackling poverty. The poverty agenda has shifted away from ‘top-down’ action by central government towards the engagement of local voluntary and community organisations. As small, independent groups with their own ideas about tackling poverty, VCOs represent a powerful, ‘bottom-up’ approach.

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

This note summarises the results of a project to explore the discrepancies in non-decent social sector dwelling estimates reported in a national survey and local statistical returns.

The sources have been used to assess progress in making homes decent as part of the decent homes programmes and the government commitment to service delivery through former public service agreement 7. Contents include: main findings of the reconciliation protect; monitoring progress according to PSA7; data splices for PSA 7; national survey and landlord decent homes statistics.

This document comprises two separate reports on research undertaken in 2008/09 on the Pensions Education Fund (PEF). Part 1 is on the costs associated with the delivery of the main outputs associated with PEF, such as workplace seminars, by Risk Solutions, and Part 2 on the role and activities of pensions information intermediaries (or pensions ‘champions’) in the workplace, by IFF Ltd.