research and evaluation

This study assesses the need and demand within voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) for relevant, analysed and well-presented data to support their work tackling poverty. The poverty agenda has shifted away from ‘top-down’ action by central government towards the engagement of local voluntary and community organisations. As small, independent groups with their own ideas about tackling poverty, VCOs represent a powerful, ‘bottom-up’ approach.

This report summarises the findings of the Final Evaluation of the Working for Families Fund (WFF). WFF, which operated from 2004-08, invested in initiatives to remove childcare barriers and improve the employability of disadvantaged parents who have barriers to participating in the labour market, specifically to help them move towards, into, or continue in employment, education or training. The programme was administered by 20 local authorities (which covered 79% of Scotland’s population), operating through around 226 locally based public, private and third-sector projects.

Parental substance misuse can result in a considerable number of negative effects on the family. However, it is incredibly hard to calculate how many children and other family members might be affected. There is also growing evidence that some children appear to be more resilient than others to the negative impact of parental substance misuse. There is a need to investigate how these general statements relate to parental substance misuse across Scotland, a topic that has been given priority status by the Scottish Executive, and other key organisations.

This note summarises the results of a project to explore the discrepancies in non-decent social sector dwelling estimates reported in a national survey and local statistical returns.

The sources have been used to assess progress in making homes decent as part of the decent homes programmes and the government commitment to service delivery through former public service agreement 7. Contents include: main findings of the reconciliation protect; monitoring progress according to PSA7; data splices for PSA 7; national survey and landlord decent homes statistics.

This document comprises two separate reports on research undertaken in 2008/09 on the Pensions Education Fund (PEF). Part 1 is on the costs associated with the delivery of the main outputs associated with PEF, such as workplace seminars, by Risk Solutions, and Part 2 on the role and activities of pensions information intermediaries (or pensions ‘champions’) in the workplace, by IFF Ltd.

This review seeks to bring a somewhat hidden issue into the light, examining it and considering how the knowledge identified here might influence the future direction of services. Parenting as such has, rightly, gained increasing prominence over the last few years – but the parenting support needs of disabled parents have been largely ignored. This review was developed with two aims in mind. First, to bring together the research literature on disabled parents and, second, to set that research within the context of the policy and practice thinking of its time.

The second programme in the series looks at the work of child psychologist Jean Piaget who believed children learned through play. Subsequent experiments allowing children to imagine different social, rather than spatial, situations have had very different results. Claudia Hammond asks how far we should rely on Piaget's findings today.

This report presents a number of contributions that relate to analysing communal wastewaters for drugs and their metabolic products in order to estimate their consumption in the community. This area of work is developing in a multidisciplinary fashion, involving scientists working in different research areas. For this reason, the contributions to this publication come from a variety of different perspectives including: analytical chemistry, physiology and biochemistry, sewage engineering, spatial epidemiology and statistics, and conventional drug epidemiology.

The Evidence Based Practice and Policy (EBPP) Online Resource Training Center, is sponsored by the Willma and Albert Musher Program at the Columbia University School of Social Work (CUSSW).

The online center’s broad goal is to promote evidence based practice and policy in social work. It provides training materials, publications, and other resources to aid practitioners from a variety of helping professions in the process of formulating sound professional judgments that necessarily precede, shape, and direct thoughtfully selected assessments and interventions.

This report is based on a research study carried out by The Children's Society in the West Midlands during 2007. Charities in the West Midlands have become increasingly concerned about destitution amongst children. The British Red Cross destitution clinic in the West Midlands identified an increasing number of babies, children and young people coming through the project, mainly with their parents.