research and evaluation

The objective of this project was to describe and explain the relationship between age and living standards in later life: exploring how sensitive this relationship is to the questions being asked; and the extent to which the experience of individuals changes as they grow older.

The report is based on analysis of deprivation questions from the Poverty and Social Exclusion survey and the British Household Panel Survey.

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. NHS Health Scotland was commissioned by the Scottish Government to establish a core set of sustainable mental health indicators to enable national monitoring. This report provides the first ever systematic assessment of the adult population’s overall mental health.

Britain’s Poorest Children Revisited focuses on the experience of severe and persistent child poverty in the UK during the period 1994- 2002. The report begins by examining trends in childhood experience of severe and non-severe poverty between 1994 and 2002, with particular reference to changes after 1997, when new policies were introduced to address the problem of child poverty in the UK.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

The Countryside Agency commissioned Save the Children to manage this research, which took place in 2002. It aims to explore the nature and extent of domestic violence support provision for children and young people living in rural areas in England, to identify examples of good practice, and to highlight implications for policy, practice and improvements in the provision of domestic violence services. It responds to an identifiable research and policy vacuum relating to domestic violence services for children and young people living in rural areas.

This podcast will consider the research agenda which is emerging from the Changing Lives report and will focus on the work that Kate Skinner (Scottish Institute for Excellence in Social Work Education) is involved in to develop a research and development strategy for Social Work Services in Scotland.

This report draws on the findings of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation's Governance and Public Services research programme and other related JRF work. It also looks at how citizens are involved, how they influence decisions and how diversity and population change affect citizen and community involvement.

The round-up outlines the challenges and dilemmas that local partners, central government, councillors, staff and communities must resolve if citizens are to have more power and influence over local services and their neighbourhoods.

This review directly addresses the practical implications of multiprofessional and multiagency working on the front line. It draws messages from a diffuse range of literature spanning organisational theories, research and practice to offer guidance to practitioners, team leaders and educators. While relating the evidence to historical, theoretical and current policy contexts, it retains a primary interest in the day-to-day experience of professionals in social care, education, health and other areas, and in trying to improve the outcomes for vulnerable children and families.