research utilisation

Over several years now commentators have raised concerns that an increasing administrative burden is deflecting social workers from working directly with children and families to identify and meet their needs. This study involved a secondary analysis of existing research data to provide information on the extent to which social workers report spending their time on direct activities with children, young people and their families, and on indirectly related activities such as liaising with other professionals or recording information.

One year ago the Scottish Government launched Scotland’s first drugs strategy since devolution. Central to the strategy was a new approach to tackling problem drug use based firmly on the concept of recovery. The action set out in the strategy reflects that tackling drug use requires action across a broad range of areas. This progress report takes the same approach.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This review begins with a foreword stating that the publication in February 1999 of the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry report was a defining moment in police relations with black and minority ethnic groups. It then makes five key recommendations. An executive summary gives the background and outlines the broad structure of the report. Sections then put the inquiry into context, examine its recommendations theme by theme, and describe its recommendations on police culture, procedures and training.

This document comprises two separate reports on research undertaken in 2008/09 on the Pensions Education Fund (PEF). Part 1 is on the costs associated with the delivery of the main outputs associated with PEF, such as workplace seminars, by Risk Solutions, and Part 2 on the role and activities of pensions information intermediaries (or pensions ‘champions’) in the workplace, by IFF Ltd.

This review, commissioned by the government, is the first of an ongoing series of national overview studies of Serious Case Reviews. Its aim was simple - to draw out the key findings of a sample of such case reviews, and their implications for policy and practice.

This report presents a number of contributions that relate to analysing communal wastewaters for drugs and their metabolic products in order to estimate their consumption in the community. This area of work is developing in a multidisciplinary fashion, involving scientists working in different research areas. For this reason, the contributions to this publication come from a variety of different perspectives including: analytical chemistry, physiology and biochemistry, sewage engineering, spatial epidemiology and statistics, and conventional drug epidemiology.

This report is based on a research study carried out by The Children's Society in the West Midlands during 2007. Charities in the West Midlands have become increasingly concerned about destitution amongst children. The British Red Cross destitution clinic in the West Midlands identified an increasing number of babies, children and young people coming through the project, mainly with their parents.

Evidence-based policy and practice increasingly demands the use of research as a key tool to improve practice. However, little research can be directly applied to practice, many practitioners aren't equipped to digest research and appropriate support systems are lacking. What is needed is a better understanding of the relationship between social care research and the work of social care practitioners, including what organisational structures are needed to enable the use of research.