research utilisation

Provides user abstracts that give practitioners and others easy access to research results. Most user abstracts are based on Campbell reviews, but some are based on other high-quality systematic reviews. The resource presents the findings of the reviews in a plain language, and focuses on information relevant to practitioners and decision makers, for example, people who need the research evidence in order to make the best decisions concerning other peoples welfare. Topics include domestic violence, children, crime, mental health and older people.

The Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned Ipsos MORI to carry out a research programme with the following objectives: to establish whether the social care sector in England is ready to maximise the use of elearning in terms of technical and organisational infrastructure and in terms of the availability of e-learning content for social care; to provide an assessment of the current capacity of the social care sector as a whole to use and produce e-learning, in particular in internet-based learning, and to exploit its full potential in pursuit of improved services for users

A key part of the Government’s alcohol harm reduction strategy is to monitor changes in drinking habits over time and to identify what factors are potentially contributing to the rising levels of consumption. This study is a systematic review of research relevant to trends in alcohol consumption over the last 20 to 30 years in the UK.

This research was commissioned by the Scottish Government as part of Better Together Scotland’s Patient Experience Programme. The objectives of this work were to establish a hierarchy of issues important to Scottish patients receiving hospital inpatient care and to test for differences in priorities among demographic groups. The results could then be used to inform the development of tools to measure inpatient experiences across Scotland.

This is the second report from the National Forum on Drug-related Deaths. The drug death statistics published each year in the General Register of Scotland (GROS) report are fundamental to the work of the National Forum. This year the GROS report was more detailed than ever before. The report confirmed a disappointing but not unexpected trend.

This report presents the findings of the day’s discussions, highlighting the main themes and actions proposed by participants. At several points in the day participants were asked to think of new or different ways that services could be delivered. These ideas are deliberately represented as ‘blue sky’ thinking and are not intended to indicate exact or concrete changes to services, but to provide stimulus for thought on new directions for service delivery.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This research looks at older people’s attitudes to the principle of automating parts of the Pension Credit awards process. Three key advantages to automation are highlighted: its capacity to raise awareness of entitlement, its ability to reduce perceptions of stigma, and its convenience. Although the study also reveals concerns about automation, such as privacy, these were rarely felt to be insurmountable and the advantages were generally thought to outweigh them.

This report provides a summary of the ‘Review of Developments in Inclusive Schooling’, commissioned by the Scottish Executive Education Department. The aims of the review are to: report research on significant developments related to inclusive schools or inclusive schooling; summarize emerging issues and trends; and identify areas which could benefit from further research.

Network that fosters connections, collaboration and the co-ordination of activities that promote the use of research evidence in child care and protection practice in Scotland.