literature reviews

This report was commissioned by IRISS (Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services) in 2008.  Its aim was to establish a wider context for practitioner research and to explore its impact on practice. It identifies two distinct forms of literature. First, there is literature that conceptualises, theorises, researches or evaluates practitioner research. Secondly, there is literature that is practitioner research. The review considers both forms and draws together a series of questions that emerge.

Review to gather together, describe and comment on international evidence on the educational experiences offered to young children. It was commissioned by the Scottish Executive Education Department at a time when the existing curriculum guidance (A Curriculum Framework for Children 3 to 5, SCCC, 1999) was under review and a national process of educational reform for children aged 3-18 was under way.

Review prepared to summarise the relevant evidence base and advise policy colleagues of the known effectiveness of specific early years health interventions.

The review covers the following areas: pregnancy at a young age; maternal and foetal health during pregnancy; maternal and child nutrition and physical and mental health; child development and early education; parenting in the early years; vulnerable groups and longer term impacts.

Purpose of the review is to consider the original sources on children’s development as well as the critical reviews of these. The focus is on research findings published since 2000 as the ultimate goal was to update, rather than to repeat, the evidence base on which the EYFS was originally based.

Literature review that aims to identify the existing evidence in relation to children and young people’s views of the processes, and to identify any gaps. At the time of publication, the Government has released the Adoption Action Plan (DfE, 2012) with measures designed to reduce delays in the adoption process.

The views and experiences of children already in the care system will be vital in helping to ensure that changes to current systems meet their individual needs and improve their life chances.

This systematic literature review of Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) arises from the second Serious Case Review (SCR) of the death of Peter Connelly (Haringey Local Safeguarding Children Board, 2009), in whose case SFBT was being partially used within children’s social care services.

The Peter Connelly SCR Overview Report included the recommendation to examine whether any models of practice had an influence on the way in which Peter’s case was managed.

Staff in care homes for older people can be confused as to what constitutes restraint, and unsure how to balance their responsibilities to residents with the rights of residents to make their own decisions. This report is based on a selection of literature that addresses these questions, as well as considering how, when and why restraint is used. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in October 2009.

There are widespread assumptions about the potentially beneficial impact of short breaks on family carers and disabled children, including reduced carer stress and an increased capacity for family carers to continue caring, and increased child enjoyment of a wider range of social opportunities. This review aims to systematically evaluate the existing international research evidence concerning the impact of short breaks, to determine where there is robust evidence for the impact of short breaks on families with a disabled child and where more evidence is needed.

Report of a study which assessed the role of respite care for various groups including children with complex needs, adults with learning disabilities, multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia sufferers and frail elderly people. It also identified the most appropriate outcome measures for use with these groups in the evaluation of respite care.

This literature review examines the evidence relating to people with dementia living in extra care housing, commissioned by the Housing and Dementia Research Consortium (HDRC) in November 2008. Key aims were to identify recent literature with a focus on evidence relating to the following: design and use of the built environment; facilities, furnishings and equipment; care, support and therapeutic services; organisation and management; outcomes in relation to health, wellbeing, policy and cost.