research methodologies

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

This revised edition of HM Inspectorate of Education's report How good is our school? replaces all previous versions.

Along with a revised edition of Child at the Centre, this document forms the third part of How good is our school? The Journey to Excellence.

The aim of this publication is to help schools to evaluate the quality of its education, based around a set of quality indicators.

A summary version of the research report identifying interventions that appeared to make the most differences in terms of both the educational experience and the educational outcomes of the looked after children and young people participating in the pilot projects. The report was produced by Strathclyde University and published by the Scottish Government.

This study explores what can be learnt about education and poverty from children's own perspective when they are empowered as active researchers. It focuses on reading and writing proficiency as a potential route out of poverty and studies two schools in contrasting socio-economic areas.

This report presents the findings of a qualitative evaluation of the Jobseeker Mandatory Activity (JMA) pilot. The JMA provided extra support to help Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA) claimants back into the labour market.

The focus was on those aged 25 years or more that had been claiming benefits for six months. The intervention comprised a three-day work-focused course delivered by external providers followed by three Jobcentre Plus personal adviser interviews. The pilot was tested in ten areas over a two-year period with the first customers entering provision in April 2006.

Scottish Government publication that presents statistics on secure accommodation in Scotland including capacity, usage, costs, staffing and the young people admitted and discharged.

The objective of this project was to describe and explain the relationship between age and living standards in later life: exploring how sensitive this relationship is to the questions being asked; and the extent to which the experience of individuals changes as they grow older.

The report is based on analysis of deprivation questions from the Poverty and Social Exclusion survey and the British Household Panel Survey.

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Report that reviews evaluation findings from the US experience in providing return-to-work supports for people with disabilities and discusses the implications for similar efforts in the UK.

It provides lessons for developing and evaluating future UK employment initiatives, especially for people with severe psychiatric conditions and long-term disability claimants.

This study assesses the need and demand within voluntary and community organisations (VCOs) for relevant, analysed and well-presented data to support their work tackling poverty. The poverty agenda has shifted away from ‘top-down’ action by central government towards the engagement of local voluntary and community organisations. As small, independent groups with their own ideas about tackling poverty, VCOs represent a powerful, ‘bottom-up’ approach.