research methodologies

Report of a study carried out to determine carers views on the quality of existing support services, provide evidence of how existing support services make carers lives easier from the carers perspective and uncover gaps in existing service provision for carers.

This report provides findings from the third wave of a qualitative longitudinal study, which began in 2003, following a sample of lone mothers who elected to move into employment supported by tax credits following a period of unemployment in receipt of Income Support (or in a few cases Jobseeker's Allowance). The main aim of the research was to explore how lone mothers and their children manage and adapt to employment over time.

This in-depth study explores the motivations for ‘planned’ teenage pregnancy in England. The findings have important implications for the Teenage Pregnancy Strategy and the increasing political agenda on young people and health. The report is based on 51 in-depth interviews, undertaken among teenagers in six relatively disadvantaged locations who reported their pregnancy as 'planned' (41 women and 10 men).

New research published today by the Department for Work and Pensions explores possible explanations for the relatively high levels of worklessness among tenants in social housing. A separate, forthcoming, report will present the detailed research findings.

Reports on current activity and research in relation to information, advice and advocacy and the delivery of 'Putting People First'. The research included: a literature review; a survey of directors of adults social services; a review of a sample of local authority and national websites; and in-depth work with selected local authorities and national organisations. Examples of good practice and recommendations for the development of services are included.

This is one of a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. It discusses some of the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research and argues that qualitative methods are suitable for the generation of rich, narrative accounts of lived experiences that may aid the identification of factors promoting recovery.

IRISS Podcast - Interview with Professor Ian Shaw at the University of York. Ian is currently evaluating the initiative taken by Children 1st and the Glasgow School of Social Work to develop a practitioner research programme.

Paper setting out some of the methodological issues concerning research on literacy development in Down syndrome and reviewing interventions to promote reading in school-age children with Down syndrome. Directions for future research are also discussed.

Paper providing an overview of current knowledge about families of children with Down syndrome and raising a number of issues needing further research.

This study examines a joint NHS-Local Authority initiative providing a dedicated nursing and physiotherapy team to three residential care homes in Bath and North East Somerset. The initiative aims to meet the nursing needs of residents where they live and to train care home staff in basic nursing.