research methodologies

This report on the consultation "Safe and secure homes for our most vulnerable children" accompanies Insight 30 and provides a robust analysis of all responses using both quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches.

This report presents findings of a qualitative research project commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to investigate the relationship between mental health and employment. The research was conducted during 2007 by the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York and the Institute for Employment Studies.

It is well known that disabled people face additional costs to enable them to meet their needs. However, there has been no clear evidence about the true extent of these costs. This research, conducted by the Centre for Research in Social Policy with the support of Disability Alliance, presents budget standards for groups of disabled people who have different needs arising from physical or sensory impairments.

Effective support for disabled parents is still rare, though many local authorities are beginning to recognise its importance. The National Family and Parenting Institute researched how supportive practice could be improved by talking to disabled parents and visiting four local authorities that are developing work in this area.

This is the fourth in a series of discussion papers designed to help generate debate on how best to promote and support recovery from long-term mental health problems in Scotland. This discussion paper provides an overview of some of the findings of longitudinal mental health outcome studies that have been conducted in the course of the few last decades in different countries and with different patient groups.

Little is known about the influences of religious beliefs and practices on parenting adolescents. Yet religious beliefs and practices have the potential to profoundly influence many aspects of life, including approaches to parenting. This is particularly relevant with increasing diversity of religious affiliations in contemporary British society.

This research study was designed to examine the different factors that affect the work, savings and retirement decisions of ethnic minority groups. The aim of this qualitative research was to fill acknowledged gaps in existing research to ensure that policies are appropriate and sensitive to any cultural differences. The findings are based on depth interviews conducted with people from the six main ethnic minority groups in the UK (Indian, Pakistani, Black Caribbean, Black African, Bangladeshi and Chinese), including those below and above State Pension age.

Policy-makers and commentators often blame ‘bad parenting’ for children and young people’s troublesome behaviour. What can research tell us about the influence of parenting, especially the parent-child relationships in millions of ‘ordinary’ families? This report includes research based on the perspectives of mothers, fathers and children themselves. They were commissioned by the JRF to inform its own Parenting Research and Development programme.

This report provides a summary of the ‘Review of Developments in Inclusive Schooling’, commissioned by the Scottish Executive Education Department. The aims of the review are to: report research on significant developments related to inclusive schools or inclusive schooling; summarize emerging issues and trends; and identify areas which could benefit from further research.

IRISS Podcast - Interview with Neil Lunt, a researcher and a lecturer from the University of York which is currently evaluating the initiative taken by Children First and Glasgow School Social Work to develop a practitioner research programme as part of the study he undertook a literature review on practitioner research and social services.