research dissemination

This report aims to highlight characteristics of good practice, raise issues and suggest further ways of improving the overall performance of pupils. As well as revealing some good practice, the findings highlight a number of issues including a lack of consistency and clarity across Scotland in identifying, measuring, and tackling underachievement for the lowest-attaining pupils.

The research was carried out by Stephen McKay and Harriet Clarke at the University of Birmingham on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and the Office for Disability Issues (ODI). The report provides evidence on the effect that being a disabled adult, or having a disabled child, has on rates of family break-up, on repartnering or having children.

This report reviews evidence on the impact of migration into Scotland since 2004, when the accession of the A8 countries - Poland, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia - to the European Union resulted in increased migration into the UK. The review includes available evidence in relation to other groups, including asylum seekers and refugees. The review uses evidence from a range of published and unpublished sources, including datasets, surveys and qualitative studies, across the two main areas of economic and employment impacts and social impacts.

This report draws directly from evidence gathered from the HMIE inspection programme. It highlights developments in practice and provides an important point of reference for all those involved in designing and taking forward new models of pupil support.

Recovery is a concept that is gaining prominence in the discourse about mental health. However, there is no consensus about what it means and debate continues about how it can be used to develop person-centred mental health services.

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.

This report examines the establishment, operation and impacts of intensive family intervention projects operating in Scotland. The research was initiated mainly to evaluate the three ‘Breaking the Cycle’ (BtC) schemes funded by the Scottish Government as a two-year pilot programme running from 2006/07-2008/09. In addition to the BtC projects (in Falkirk, Perth and Kinross and South Lanarkshire) the research also encompassed the Dundee Families Project (set up in 1996) and the Aberdeen Families Project (established in 2005).

Research report published by the research group in the Scottish Government Education Analytical Services Division, which provides an overview of strategic approaches to parenting support at local level, looking at strategic development within Community Health Partnerships and Local Authorities. It was published in conjunction with two other documents: Support and Services for Parents: A Review of Practice Development in Scotland and Support and Services for Parents: A Review of the Literature in Engaging and Supporting Parents.

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. NHS Health Scotland was commissioned by the Scottish Government to establish a core set of sustainable mental health indicators to enable national monitoring. This report provides the first ever systematic assessment of the adult population’s overall mental health.

Report that reviews evaluation findings from the US experience in providing return-to-work supports for people with disabilities and discusses the implications for similar efforts in the UK.

It provides lessons for developing and evaluating future UK employment initiatives, especially for people with severe psychiatric conditions and long-term disability claimants.