research dissemination

Growing up in Scotland (GUS): non-resident parent summary report

The Growing Up in Scotland study (GUS) is an important longitudinal research project aimed at tracking the lives of a cohort of Scottish children from the early years, through childhood and beyond.

The study is funded by the Scottish Government and carried out by the Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen). Its principal aim is to provide information to support policy-making, but it is also intended to be a broader resource that can be drawn on by academics, voluntary sector organisations and other interested parties.

Interchange 66: Developments in Inclusive Schooling

This report provides a summary of the ‘Review of Developments in Inclusive Schooling’, commissioned by the Scottish Executive Education Department. The aims of the review are to: report research on significant developments related to inclusive schools or inclusive schooling; summarize emerging issues and trends; and identify areas which could benefit from further research.

Shifting care from hospital to the community in Europe: Economic challenges and opportunities

An introduction gives the history of how in most European countries for many decades large institutions dominated provision for people with severe and chronic disabilities, including those with mental health problems, and how this changed. Trends in the balance of care, changes in provision, and policies to develop community care and the allocation of resources are described, challenges listed and opportunities outlined, ending with a conclusion that research on progress in this area in Europe has been limited.

Towards a mentally flourishing Scotland: policy and action plan 2009-2011

Policy document that sets out the Scottish Government's action plan for building on existing work to improve mental wellbeing in Scotland up until 2011 by identifying strategic priorities for action and putting in place the infrastructure support and coordination necessary to facilitate implementation and support delivery. The government is committed making sure adequate services are in plance and to working through social policy and health improvement activity to reduce the burden of mental health problems and mental illness and to promote good mental wellbeing.

Missing Out. A report on children at risk of missing out on educational opportunities

This report aims to highlight characteristics of good practice, raise issues and suggest further ways of improving the overall performance of pupils. As well as revealing some good practice, the findings highlight a number of issues including a lack of consistency and clarity across Scotland in identifying, measuring, and tackling underachievement for the lowest-attaining pupils.

Exploring disability, family formation and break-up: reviewing the evidence

The research was carried out by Stephen McKay and Harriet Clarke at the University of Birmingham on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and the Office for Disability Issues (ODI). The report provides evidence on the effect that being a disabled adult, or having a disabled child, has on rates of family break-up, on repartnering or having children.

Recent migration into Scotland: the evidence base

This report reviews evidence on the impact of migration into Scotland since 2004, when the accession of the A8 countries - Poland, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia - to the European Union resulted in increased migration into the UK. The review includes available evidence in relation to other groups, including asylum seekers and refugees. The review uses evidence from a range of published and unpublished sources, including datasets, surveys and qualitative studies, across the two main areas of economic and employment impacts and social impacts.

Personal Support for Pupils in Scottish Schools

This report draws directly from evidence gathered from the HMIE inspection programme. It highlights developments in practice and provides an important point of reference for all those involved in designing and taking forward new models of pupil support.

Whose recovery is it anyway?

Recovery is a concept that is gaining prominence in the discourse about mental health. However, there is no consensus about what it means and debate continues about how it can be used to develop person-centred mental health services.

Support and Services for Parents: A Review of the Literature in Engaging and Supporting Parents

Literature review published by the Scottish Government which draws together existing knowledge on assessing and evaluating parenting interventions. In conducting the literature review, the research team was interested in re-examining the historical policy context to locate the rationale for the introduction of Parenting Orders and the apparent under use of the provisions and the evidence of risk and protective factors and the interrelated issues of antisocial behaviour and child care, alongside effective approaches to family service provision.