outcomes

Community Care Outcomes Framework: review of the framework 2006-2011

In December 2008, following two years of gestation, the Scottish Government issued a set of national outcomes for Community Care – or the Community Care Outcomes Framework (CCOF). After three years of local work implementing the Framework it was agreed that a review would be conducted in 2011 to re-examine it and test whether it was still fit for purpose. The review was carried out by the and the

'We've got to talk about outcomes...': a review of the Talking Points personal outcomes approach

Review which establishes the nature of activity in respect of the approach across partnerships and providers across Scotland, in particular since an earlier review in 2008. It is based primarily on interviews with forty key informants (from partnerships, providers and national organisations) and responses from a sample of those already using Talking Points to a web-based survey. Talking Points is an approach which focuses on assessing the outcomes important to the individual, planning how they will be achieved and reviewing the extent to which they have been attained.

Supporting families with complex needs: findings from LARC4

Report that offers new evidence from more than 30 case studies, showing that even for children and families with much more complex needs, including those on the edge of care, it is still possible to achieve significant improvements in outcomes in a very cost-effective way by intervening appropriately once the families‟ needs have come to the attention of practitioners.

An outcomes framework for young people

Outcomes framework designed to support understanding and measurement of the connections between intrinsic personal and social development outcomes and longer-term extrinsic outcomes. The framework: - Proposes a model of seven interlinked clusters of social and emotional capabilities that are of value to all young people, supported by a strong evidence base demonstrating the links to longer-term outcomes. - Sets out a matrix of available tools to measure these capabilities, outlining which capabilities they cover, and key criteria such as their cost and the number of users.

Overview of outcome measurement for adults using social care services and support (Methods review 6)

This review discusses the measurement of outcome for individuals and their carers for research purposes, particularly the type of research which evaluates the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social care for adults and which has implications for social care practice. It discusses what is meant by outcome in social care, presenting a model that describes different ‘types’ of outcome and how these are related to one another.

Payment for results: opportunities and challenges for improving outcomes for children

'Payment by Results'(PbR) is a way of commissioning services which offers financial rewards to providers for the achievement of positive social outcomes.

The main aim of PbR is to enable the delivery of cost-saving preventative social interventions and to incentivise better outcomes for service users.

Measuring personal outcomes: challenges and strategies (IRISS Insights, no.12)

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics. This Insight, written by Dr Emma Miller, Honorary Senior Research Associate at Glasgow School of Social Work, considers some of the challenges of measuring outcomes and emerging responses to these.

Payment by results in tackling youth crime

Notes from a seminar held on Monday 24th October 2011 at the Nuffield Foundation. The seminar took place as a round-table discussion attended by 28 policy makers, youth justice practitioners, researchers, specialists from children’s organisations and think-tanks. Sara Nathan OBE, a broadcaster and a member of the Judicial Appointments Commission as well as the Independent Commission on Youth Crime, chaired the meeting.

Meeting children’s needs for care and protection

Report on a series of seminars set-up to draw together national and international knowledge and professional, policy and research expertise in relation to the management, evaluation and research of everyday multi-professional intervention to safeguard children.

The series has resulted in fostering new links between different fields and networks in pursuit of improving data collection and use, in addition to widening opportunities for future collaborative research and development activities.

Joining up health and social social care: improving value for money across the interface

Briefing that sets out the potential areas for local action; the questions local commissioners might ask themselves and the evidence that may help with the answers; potential indicators for identifying areas for improvements and for tracking progress; and what the national data suggests in these key areas.