evaluation

Launched in August 2006, the National Telecare Development Programme (TDP) aims to help more people in Scotland live at home for longer, with safety and security, by promoting the use of telecare in Scotland through the provision of a development fund and associated support.

This report evaluates the impact of the first two years of operation.

Tool for supporting the evaluation of public involvement and participation in health services. A partner to the Participation Toolkit, it is a stand-alone guide for assessing the way in which a participation project has been undertaken (process) and the results of that activity (outcomes). It does not set out to be a definitive guide to evaluation, but aims to provide resources, references and tools to help people develop their own approach to evaluation.

The guide will:

Since 2010 the Scottish Government has been funding Who Cares? Scotland to develop and deliver a national corporate parenting training programme. This training course is due to complete in March 2013 and there is the potential for a second phase of the programme.

Report that explores the feasibility of and rationale for the design of an outcome evaluation framework aimed at assessing the impact of the play@home scheme on the scheme’s four main objectives: physical activity, movement skills, cognitive/language development, and parent-child bonding. The project was conducted in two interlocking phases.

This report forms part of SCIE’s wider work on economics. It presents SCIE’s position on how economic evaluations should be undertaken, and the results used, to inform decision-making in the social care sector.

The social work remodelling project was a pilot programme developed to allow authorities to explore different ways of delivering social work practice.

Local authorities were provided with additional resources to attempt to address the deficits they identified in delivering an effective social work offer to children and their families.

Evaluation to assess the development and impact of interventions implemented within the 3 local authorities test sites – Dumfries and Galloway, City of Glasgow and Highlands – to improve uptake of self-directed support (SDS).

The evidence from this study presents a compelling case for local authorities and their partners to develop and implement intensive family intervention with families with multiple and complex needs. Whilst funding for the Pathfinders formally ended in 2010, four fifths of the Family Pathfinder and Young Carer Pathfinders are being sustained in some form.

Small-scale survey that examines approaches to the commissioning of services for young people in 12 local authority areas and reports on the experience of national organisations involved in this work.

Recorded as part of the IRISS Masterclass Series workshops, this podcast details what next practice can offer to people using social services. Geoff Mulgan focuses on two main areas - productivity in the workplace and tools for innovation.