sensory impairments

Report from a half-day seminar on 7 February 2012, organised by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE), ARUP and the Thomas Pocklington Trust.

The topic of this briefing is parents with physical or sensory impairments and ways of addressing any perceived barriers to their parenting. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in February 2005.

It is well known that disabled people face additional costs to enable them to meet their needs. However, there has been no clear evidence about the true extent of these costs. This research, conducted by the Centre for Research in Social Policy with the support of Disability Alliance, presents budget standards for groups of disabled people who have different needs arising from physical or sensory impairments.

This paper outlines the key findings from a study which examined the community care and mental health needs of, and current service provision for, sensory impaired adults in Scotland. The study involved a literature review, a mapping exercise of existing services, and consultation with service planners and providers and with service users and their carers. The research focussed on Deaf, deafened, blind, partially sighted and dual sensory impaired adults.

This briefing focuses on fathers’ experiences of their child’s disability, impairment or chronic illness, and their resulting needs. Fathers of disabled children experience many of the same needs and concerns as mothers, but they do also have particular issues and needs. Fathers of disabled children are fathers first, and fathers of a disabled child second.

This review of services for people with learning disabilities began by looking at services, especially in social and healthcare, and their relationship with education, housing, employment and other areas. It also focused on people’s lifestyles and wider policies including social inclusion, equality and fairness, and the opportunity for people to improve themselves through continuous learning. The review also recommends that for all but a few people, health and social care should be provided in their own homes or in community settings alongside the rest of the population.

This short training scenario was originally used in the context of introductory child protection training. It gives brief information from which participants are asked to identify what they are concerned about and what they would do next. A school is concerned about the behaviour of a disabled child.