autistic spectrum disorders

This first chapter is a free-standing condensed version of the strategy which provides readers with an overview of what autism is and the challenges which individuals with the condition and their families face in everyday life. It then describes how the autism strategy will address their needs over the next 10 years.

Chapter two provides more detailed information on the issues contained in the overview for those who want to take more time to understand the issues in greater depth. It explains the context behind each of the recommendations and why these are critical to success.

Briefing that explains what the "autistic spectrum‟ is and examines statistics on its prevalence in the UK.

It summarises responses to the Member's consultation on the proposal for an autism strategy, considers the financial and legal implications of the Bill and provides an overview of existing legislation and policy relating to individuals on the autistic spectrum.

The UK Autism Foundation (UKAF) is a charitable organisation which began in 2008. It has launched a £10 million fundraising program to realise its aims to build the first ever state of the art Autism Centre in London, build an autism school and to launch initiatives to help families dealing with autism who are poor. The UKAF developed from the work of the Autism Awareness Campaign UK founded in 2000 by parents and carers. The site provides access to the newsletter, and brief information about autism.

Autism Speaks is a registered charity in the UK and was launched by the autism campaigner and philanthropist, Dame Stephanie Shirley in 2004. It is the only charity which raises money for biomedical research into the causes of autism spectrum disorders. The website provides information about autism, including its causes and impact. Information is also provided on the research carried out by the charity, including collaborative research, UK research projects, grants and fellowships, and also details of news, resources and events.

This report, one of a series of supplementary reports to 'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities, focuses on improving services and supports for children and young people with learning disabilities and with autism spectrum disorder in Scotland.

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000. It set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (including Asperger’s syndrome) to lead a full life, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This publication builds on current guidance, and highlights existing information and good practice for commissioners in primary care trusts and local authorities who have responsibility for commissioning services for adults with autistic spectrum disorders. It aim is to ensure that commissioners enable, empower and promote independence and meaningful choices for adults with autistic spectrum.

More than half a million people in Britain have autism, and the numbers of diagnosed cases is rising rapidly. Yet we know very little about this puzzling condition. In a month-long series of programmes and features, Radio 4 attempt to separate fact from theory, and to find out what is available to help autistic children and adults, and their families.

'The same as you?' review of services for people with learning disabilities was published in 2000 and set out a 10-year programme of change that would support children and adults with learning disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (including Asperger’s Syndrome) to lead full lives, giving them choice about where they live and what they do.

This report was produced by the Day Services Group, a subgroup of the National Implementation Group, which was set up to look at how day services in Scotland are putting the recommendations of The same as you? (SAY) into practice.

Christopher Gillberg is Professor of Child Psychiatry at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and Visiting Professor in the Division of Community Based Sciences, University of Glasgow. One of the world's leading academic child psychiatrists, he has published hundreds of papers on autism, ADHD and related conditions.