user participation

This report is about involving people who use services in adult safeguarding.It looks at policies and practice, as well as examples of how user involvement is being supported, barriers to greater user involvement, and lessons learned from evaluating adult safeguarding processes. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).

This report draws on the views of service users and carers from the Social Work Education Participation (SWEP) website steering group and members of the General Social Care Council (GSCC) Visitors group who inspect social work programmes with GSCC inspectors. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in July 2011. Review date is July 2014.

The Northern Ireland Social Care Council (NISCC), the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) and the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) commissioned this research with the aim of strengthening user involvement in Northern Ireland. Report 18 looks across health and social care services for children, young people and adults. Report published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in February 2008.

Service user participation in social care has increased markedly in the wider service user movement over the last 20 years. However, the participation of black and minority ethnic service users has diminished over the same period. This report identifies some of the reasons for this reduction and concludes by stating that given the right opportunities, support and resources, there is a genuine commitment and interest from service users to become more actively involved in the process. Report published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in July 2006.

This paper presents the process and outcomes of research in to service user and carer participation in developing social care services. This research was charged not with evaluating the impact of participation, but with scoping what is know about it and how evaluations are being conducted. Briefing paper published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in June 2007.

This paper outlines a project commissioned by the Department of Health which focused on participation in the undergraduate and postgraduate social work degree. Focusing on how service user and care organisations can develop their involvement in the undergraduate and post graduate social work degree and drawing on successes of the first two years, the paper then goes on to identify existing barriers to successful partnership and possible ways forward. This project was a joint venture between Shaping Our Lives, Department of Health and SCIE.

The paper aims to identify what is happening in the social care sector with the involvement of carers and the impact participation has had on service improvement. It complements Position paper 3: Has service user involvement made a difference to social care services? The position paper is intended to help social services providers to work better with carers to develop social care services. Position paper published by Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in June 2006.

This guide is written for any individual, group or organisation wishing to find out whether service user and carer participation is making a difference.

This guide is one of a series published by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). SCIE guides are one-stop shops for social care practitioners, presenting key findings, current legislation and examples of what is working well to guide and inform practice. First edition published in June 2007,
this edition published September 2007 by the Social Care Institute for Excellence.

Part of the IRISS What Works: Putting Research into Practice series, this video interview with Peter Beresford focuses on effective user involvement.

An interactive research project with residents of two traditionally white estates in Bradford, this study explores their perceptions of community and attitudes towards participation, both on the estates and with external agencies. It explores why, given the partial achievements and commitment to improving the lives of some of the most excluded social groups in the UK, government has been unable to generate self-sustaining improvements in these kinds of settings.