service users

Report on an informal programme to establish, support and strengthen user-driven commissioning in six local sites by focusing on three complementary stepping stones.

This learning resource will provide the learner with the necessary skills and knowledge to critically examine — from point of assessment to actual service delivery — how the needs of minority ethnic carers and service users are currently being met. It therefore aims to ensure that the need to achieve equality of opportunity and access lies at the heart of individual and collective practice.

Advice and support about how to involve people who use services and carers in designing, delivering and co-producing care services.

Facilitating older service users’ requirements for access to or re-engagement in social networks following hospital discharge is recognized in social care analysis and policy as critically important. This is because of the associated benefits for restoring physical health and psychological well-being. However, it tends to be a neglected dimension of current social care/intermediate care.

On the 4 June 2013, eight Scottish universities involved in the Scottish Inter-University Social Work Service User and Carers’ Network, supported by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) and the Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS), collaborated to produce the first national service user and carer conference aimed at highlighting the importance of involving people who have experience of using social work and/or health services in the education of social workers and other professionals.

Universal Credit (UC) will replace means-tested benefits and tax credits for people out of work or on low incomes, and transform the system of service delivery. But will UC improve service delivery and incentives to work, and reduce the complexity of the system?

This study found support for reform, but identified risks that need addressing if UC is to bring about genuine improvements for all service users.

This good practice guide is based on research conducted in 2008 to explore the extent of service user and carer involvement in the higher and further education sectors in west and southeast Scotland.

This paper gives voice to service users’ fears and concerns about risk. It identifies additional risks to those commonly identified by professionals and policy-makers and explores how perceptions of risk and rights are significantly different for mental health service users.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) commissioned this paper as part of its programme on risk, trust and relationships in an ageing society, which aims to explore how risk features in the lives of adults who use care and support.