immigration

This guide is about the rights and entitlements of separated refugee and asylum-seeking children in England (often described as unaccompanied children). These are children under 18 years of age who are outside their country and separated from both parents or their legal/customary primary care-giver. The majority of separated children come to the UK alone. However, some children become separated in the UK after informal foster arrangements or family break down.

This resource is a review which looks specifically at problems with the implementation of the Human Rights Act. The review was commissioned in the immediate aftermath of the Inquiry Report (by HM Chief Inspector of Probation) into the release of Anthony Rice, which had suggested that human rights arguments, and the Human Rights Act, had been contributory factors in the events leading to the murder of Naomi Bryant.

This guide is designed to assist immigration officers working at ports of entry. It includes practical tips on supporting unaccompanied asylum-seeking children on arrival that can easily be incorporated into day-to-day work; answers to frequently asked questions about asylum-seeking young people and why they come to the UK; and information on age assessments and trafficking.

This resource is one of the units on the Open University's OpenLearn website, which provides free and open educational resources for learners and educators around the world. This Unit looks at the work of William Beveridge in reforming the field of social welfare after World War II. Particular attention is paid to the attitude towards women and immigrants to the United Kingdom.

Report that stresses how vital it is for the authorities to co-operate to help trafficked children get access to their rights and entitlements, as well as certainty about their immigration status, in order to move forward after escaping the exploitative situation. It aims to provide a wake-up call to teachers, social workers, third sector organisations and the police.

This working paper forms part of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics of Migration project. It looks at how Polish migrants have increasingly used social networks to find employment in the UK. Although this has allowed them to maintain high employment rates it brings a risk that migrants will be "locked in" to low-skilled jobs and less integrated into the wider economy and society. The integration policy agenda is currently focused on long term settlement but many migrants only come to the UK for a short period of time.

Report of a House of Commons inquiry into the detention of children in the UK immigration system. It looked at why children were detained, how long they were detained for and the conditions inside Yarl's Wood Immigration Removal Centre, Bedfordshire. It concludes that improvements need to be made to the legal process, the processing of asylum claims and the treatment of detainees pending legal decisions.

Consultation document intended to provoke debate and discussion over the UK Government's proposals for the future of the asylum and immigration system in the UK.

This paper examines the implications of increasing migration to rural areas, looking in particular at the economics of this phenomenon. We explore the roles migrants are playing, the economic impacts of migration on existing populations and businesses, and what future migratory trends might be. In particular, we consider whether recent migration to rural Britain has led to any risks for rural economies; and if so, how these risks can be managed.

Report presenting the findings of the Children's Commissioner for England's visit to Yarl's Wood in 2008 and considering the detention of children there in the light of the UK Government's obligations under Article 37 of the UNCRC. It looks particularly at the effect of detention on children's mental and physical health.