immigration

Report that highlights the pernicious situation of these forgotten children; young people who have arrived in the UK separated from their parents or usual guardians and who are detained in immigration removal centres as adults.

It discusses the circumstances leading to the detention of unaccompanied children, wrongly treated as adults and therefore in extremely vulnerable situations, as their needs as children are left unrecognised. It also recommends changes to the system that should reduce the number of young people whose short lives are damaged in this way.

Paper that analyses the various ways in which the British government has sought to manage the expanding black and minority ethnic communities which now form large proportions of the population in cities. It goes on to argue that government needs to appreciate that there are different modes of integration and that successful integration needs to draw on approaches that go beyond non-discrimination, important though that is.

Report that follows on from the Children’s Commissioner’s earlier report Landing in Kent. It focuses on immigration procedures to which unaccompanied children arriving in Kent are subject between their first encounter with the authorities and the time they are placed in the care of Kent County Council children’s social care services.

This research investigates the experiences of UK immigration detention of children1 and their families. Numerous research studies (Crawley and Lester, 2005; Lorek et al, 2009; Burnett et al, 2010) and inspection reports (Aynsley-Green, 2005; HMIP, 2008; 2010) have highlighted that the experience of detention, even for a relatively brief period of time, has a detrimental effect on the mental and physical health of children.

The study involved an examination of practices for checking the nationality and migrant status of arrestees in a sample of custody suites in England and Wales in 2006/07.

The study also involved the piloting of enhanced checking processes in four custody suites. The aim was to examine the use of immigration powers when dealing with foreign national (FN) arrestees and whether this could be expanded and improved.

This factsheet discusses the way that HIV-related discrimination can intrude into many contexts and many parts of the lives of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) and people thought to be HIV positive. It argues that for PLWHA, or those assumed to be HIV-positive, no area of life is untouched by stigma and no area of life is invulnerable to discrimination.

Paper dealing with the social evils of UK society as experienced by people whose voices are not usually heard. Workshops/discussion groups with lone parents, ex-offenders, unemployed and other vulnerable and socially excluded people were used to explore personal experiences of living and coping with social evils. Ideas for overcoming them suggest a combined individual and collective responsibility to take forward social change.

Paper discussing issues perceived as social problems in contemporary society and arguing that these should be put more in perspective when compared with the social ills of past eras such as the Victorian.