older people

This is the seventh in a series of regular reports which began in 1998. Its aim is to provide an independent assessment of the progress being made in eliminating poverty and reducing social exclusion in Britain.

Paper examining the ways in which personal budgets will affect the social and health care market. It considers what prospective budget holders know and think about personal budgets, how they would spend it and what difficulties they foresee. It also suggests the likely challenges local authorities and other providers will face in delivering the personalisation agenda and makes recommendations on how to make the transition successfully.

Care Information Scotland (CIS) is a telephone and website service providing information about care services for older people living in Scotland.

Podcast of a talk given by Ken Laidlaw, consultant clinical psychologist, NHS Lothian at Edinburgh City Chambers, 29/01/2009. He discusses findings from research about ageing across the world.

Dignity in Care is a campaign being run by the Department of Health's website in the UK. It "aims to eliminate tolerance of indignity in health and social care services through raising awareness and inspiring people to take action." The focus of the campaign has mainly been on older people but has now been extended to include people with mental health needs. The website provides further information on the different aspects of the campaign, including relevant publications.

Pamphlet investigating the impact of UK Government policy on four groups of economically inactive people, young people, those aged between 50 and 65, lone parents and disabled people. It concludes schemes such as the New Deal have not worked for these groups and suggests ways in which policy might be made more effective.

This BBC radio programme looks at how the number of people diagnosed with dementia in the UK has reached 700,000, and how, often close relatives step into the role of being the main carer.

Julie Heathcote is a trainer in reminiscence-based approaches for the Alzheimer’s Society which are proving to be successful in helping both carers and the cared for to spend more quality time together. Felicity Finch joins her with a group of carers at The Lowestoft and Waveney branch of the society where she ran a Reminiscence Activities session.

Adult placements are not a new idea. For centuries, vulnerable people haven been cared for by people other than their family in their homes. But it wasn't until the 1970s and early 1980s however, that adult placement schemes, as an organised service, really took off in the UK. The guide has been developed to inform future guidance for local authority commissioners. It identifies relevant national minimum standards and highlights findings and case examples from the practice survey, as well as from the literature where available.

In general, the pain relief needs of older people with dementia are not adequately met. The aim of this research was to determine whether the same unsatisfactory treatment also applies to people with learning difficulties who have dementia and, if so, to make recommendations for improving practice. The research team was based at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships, University of Edinburgh, and the Dementia Services Development Centre, University of Stirling.

This report has been compiled by 'Opening Doors in Thanet', a group of older people living in the Isle of Thanet, who are aware of and want to help service-providers understand the difficulties, and improve the lives, of Lesbian, Gay Bi-sexual and Transgendered (LGBT) older people. It is based on the results of a questionnaire sent out to sheltered housing providers, residential homes, nursing homes, care companies and day centres catering for the older population of Thanet.