multicultural society

In a contribution to the JRF's 'social evils' series, author Ferdinand Mount discusses the theme of 'inequality'. In 2007 the JRF asked the British public for their views on what constituted a 'social evil'. In this Viewpoint, Ferdinand Mount explores one aspect raised by many respondents - the problems created by an unequal society. He discusses five inequalities and how to remedy them: political inequality; differing life outcomes; inequality of opportunity; treatment and responsibility; shared equality of membership in the areas of nation, faith and family.

BioSocieties is committed to the scholarly exploration of the crucial social, ethical and policy implications of developments in the life sciences and biomedicine. It provides a crucial forum where the most rigorous social research and critical analysis of these issues can intersect with the work of leading scientists, social researchers, clinicians, regulators and other stakeholders.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at how appropriate a western notion of secularism is in dealing with the complexities of a multi-faith society. Laurie Taylor is joined by Rajeev Bhargava, Professor of Political Science at the University of Delhi and Anshuman Mondal, Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary Literature at the University of Leicester, to debate whether western secularism has outlived its purpose and if anything can be learnt from the Indian model of secularism.

The JRF’s recent public consultation revealed a strong sense of unease about some of the changes shaping British society. This Viewpoint continues the discussion about modern ‘social evils’ on the theme of ‘distrusting and fearful society’. Shaun Bailey looks at relationships between individuals, the state and community, and the effects these relationships have on our daily lives that may lead us not to trust.

This report briefly reviews the evidence for the current state of community interaction within England, together with theoretical approaches such as ‘contact theory’ which can inform activities that bring individuals and groups together. The report then draws on the expertise of 28 practitioners from across the country who highlight activities which can be used to stimulate greater interaction and the obstacles and barriers that exist.

In 2008, JRF published the first ‘minimum income standard for Britain’, based on what members of the public thought people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. A year later, and in changing economic circumstances, the standard has been updated for inflation. This study updates 2008’s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.

The Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) in Scotland works for a just and integrated Scotland, where diversity is valued.

It uses both persuasion and powers under the law to give everyone an equal chance to live free from fear, discrimination, prejudice and racism.

Diversity and Dialogue aims to create better understanding between young people from different faiths and backgrounds. They develop projects that encourage young people to share their beliefs and values and to work together to change society for the better. Their website provides information about the partners and projects involved in Diversity and Dialogue and includes an online directory to find out more about youth interfaith projects and how to get involved.

Focus on Ethnicity and Identity paints a picture of the ethnic groups in the UK today. It includes information on their characteristics, lifestyles and experiences, placing particular emphasis on comparing and contrasting the main groups. Each overview in the Focus on series combines data from the 2001 Census and other sources to illustrate its topic, and provide links to further information.

The JRF's public consultation revealed a strong sense of unease about some of the changes shaping British society. This Viewpoint continues the discussion about modern ‘socialevils’ on the theme of ‘inequality’. Jeremy Seabrook argues that, in the face of extraordinary imbalances in society, the myth that accumulating wealth is the supreme human purpose needs to be replaced before any improvement will occur.