multicultural society

Post-immigration ‘difference’ and integration: the case of Muslims in Western Europe

Paper that analyses the various ways in which the British government has sought to manage the expanding black and minority ethnic communities which now form large proportions of the population in cities. It goes on to argue that government needs to appreciate that there are different modes of integration and that successful integration needs to draw on approaches that go beyond non-discrimination, important though that is.

Teaching English as a second or additional language

This page presents findings which may assist the teaching of English to students for whom English is not their first language. This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Cultural understanding

This page contains the findings of systematic reviews undertaken by review groups linked to the EPPI-Centre
One review has investigated the use of art education in cultural learning (the formation and exploration of identity and understanding of diversity). This topic is included in the EPPI-Centre knowledge library. The Knowledge Pages facility enables users to search for the key messages within specific subject areas to which EPPI-Centre reviews have contributed.

Estimating the costs of child poverty (Summary report)

The moral case for eradicating child poverty rests on the immense human cost of allowing children to grow up suffering physical and psychological deprivations and unable to participate fully in society. But child poverty is also costly to everyone in Britain, not just those who experience it directly. What are the costs to the whole of society of allowing child poverty to continue?

Unkind, risk averse and untrusting - if this is today's society, can we change it? (summary report)

The JRF’s recent public consultation revealed a strong sense of unease about some of the changes shaping British society. This Viewpoint continues the discussion about modern 'social evils' on the theme of ‘a decline in values’. Julia Neuberger argues that we can change society for the better by deliberately rebuilding trust, opening up our institutions, and stopping the ‘blame culture’ from preventing simple acts of kindness and altruism.

Cities and the ethic of care for the stranger

This report documents a lecture presented by Professor Ash Amin from Durham University, with a response from Matt Matravers, Director of the School of Politics, Economics, and Philosophy at University of York. The lecture discusses living with diversity and the role of cities in managing cultural difference.

Multiculturalism and secularism; Milltown boys revisited (Radio 4 series: Thinking Allowed)

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes two segments. The first looks at how appropriate a western notion of secularism is in dealing with the complexities of a multi-faith society. Laurie Taylor is joined by Rajeev Bhargava, Professor of Political Science at the University of Delhi and Anshuman Mondal, Lecturer in Modern and Contemporary Literature at the University of Leicester, to debate whether western secularism has outlived its purpose and if anything can be learnt from the Indian model of secularism.

What and who is it we don't trust? (summary report)

The JRF’s recent public consultation revealed a strong sense of unease about some of the changes shaping British society. This Viewpoint continues the discussion about modern ‘social evils’ on the theme of ‘distrusting and fearful society’. Shaun Bailey looks at relationships between individuals, the state and community, and the effects these relationships have on our daily lives that may lead us not to trust.

A minimum income standard for Britain in 2009

In 2008, JRF published the first ‘minimum income standard for Britain’, based on what members of the public thought people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. A year later, and in changing economic circumstances, the standard has been updated for inflation. This study updates 2008’s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.