immigrants

Report that highlights the pernicious situation of these forgotten children; young people who have arrived in the UK separated from their parents or usual guardians and who are detained in immigration removal centres as adults.

It discusses the circumstances leading to the detention of unaccompanied children, wrongly treated as adults and therefore in extremely vulnerable situations, as their needs as children are left unrecognised. It also recommends changes to the system that should reduce the number of young people whose short lives are damaged in this way.

A study on ―best practices in the field of the return of minors was carried out by ECRE, in strategic partnership with Save the Children, on behalf of the European Commission. The study looked at
legislation and practice regarding the return of children, either unaccompanied or within families, who return voluntarily or are forced to return because of their status as illegally staying third country
nationals.

Report that follows on from the Children’s Commissioner’s earlier report Landing in Kent. It focuses on immigration procedures to which unaccompanied children arriving in Kent are subject between their first encounter with the authorities and the time they are placed in the care of Kent County Council children’s social care services.

The Conservative-Liberal Democrat Government Coalition Agreement of 10th May 2010 included a commitment to “end the detention of children for immigration purposes”. On 25th May it was announced that a review of existing practice in the UK and elsewhere would be undertaken in order to identify how this commitment would be achieved. The terms of reference for the review were published on the UK Border Agency (UKBA) website on 11th June and debated in the House of Commons on 17th June. This paper on alternatives to detention has been produced to inform the review process.

This guide is designed to assist immigration officers working at ports of entry. It includes practical tips on supporting unaccompanied asylum-seeking children on arrival that can easily be incorporated into day-to-day work; answers to frequently asked questions about asylum-seeking young people and why they come to the UK; and information on age assessments and trafficking.

This working paper forms part of the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) Economics of Migration project. It looks at how Polish migrants have increasingly used social networks to find employment in the UK. Although this has allowed them to maintain high employment rates it brings a risk that migrants will be "locked in" to low-skilled jobs and less integrated into the wider economy and society. The integration policy agenda is currently focused on long term settlement but many migrants only come to the UK for a short period of time.

Poverty affects children from very different backgrounds and discrimination on the basis of disability, race or immigration status mean that some sections of the population are significantly over represented among poor families. However many families living in poverty also report being discriminated on the basis of being poor, and this being compounded when involved with child welfare services.

Report presenting the findings of the Children's Commissioner for England's visit to Yarl's Wood in 2008 and considering the detention of children there in the light of the UK Government's obligations under Article 37 of the UNCRC. It looks particularly at the effect of detention on children's mental and physical health.