gay men

This report contains the views and concerns of people with HIV aged 50 and over, living into an old age that many of them never expected to see. The social care needs of this rapidly growing group have not previously been addressed in the UK. The 50 Plus research project asked 410 of them – 1 in 25 of all those currently being seen for care – for their views on their current and future lives. The report also analysed the resulting data to compare three of the largest subgroups: gay/bisexual men, black African women and white heterosexuals.

This factsheet highlights the detrimental effect stigma and discrimination have on public health. It argues that responding to HIV with blame or abuse towards people living with HIV (PLWHA), simply forces the epidemic underground, creating the ideal conditions for HIV to spread.

This resource looks at the stigma and discrimination which affects people living with HIV and AIDS and the people who are perceived to be HIV positive because they are members of the communities most affected by the virus, such as gay men or Africans.

This factsheet examines the link in people’s minds between homosexuality and AIDS. It is so firmly established that discrimination against people with HIV is inseparable from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Being Positive, a two-part investigative Open University/BBC series, examines the nature of the AIDS virus, how it works and the history of the development of HIV drug treatments. Part one, Dead Unlucky and part two, Dead Lucky, follow the stories of people who have been infected. This resource is part of the Open2.net website which is the online learning portal from the Open University and the BBC.

This episode of Radio 4's Woman's Hour series looks at how being a lesbian has changed. Jenni Murray talks to Clare Summerskill about her new play, Gateway to Heaven which is based entirely on the memories of older lesbians and gay men. Their stories are an eye-opener on a time when lesbians and gay men were significantly more constrained, both legally and socially, than they are today.