support groups

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This Mind factsheet looks at understanding addiction and dependency. It also provides references for further reading and a list of useful organisations.

This summary report maps the development of services funded through Sure Start Scotland based on information provided by local authorities. The mapping exercise was carried out by a team at the Centre for Research on Families and Relationships (CRFR) commissioned by the Scottish Executive.

Caring for people with frontotemporal dementia is hard, there are few facilities tailored for the younger sufferer and those are not always appropriate for people with frontotemporal dementia. Also there are no specific treatments yet for frontotemporal dementia. All this adds to the distress, isolation and burden of caring. The PDSG tries to decrease the burden by providing information and support.

This information sheet provides the contact details of organisations who support people living with HIV and AIDS.

Episode Four of the Scottish Recovery Network's Journeys of Recovery podcast features the stories 'The evolutionary jigsaw', 'Doesn't time fly when you're depressed' and 'To hell and back'. The narrative was derived from an interview conducted as part of the 'Recovering mental health in Scotland' (2007) for the Scottish Recovery Network.

This review examines the impact of drug use upon families and carers and identifies their needs. It examines and describes the range of provision and methods of addressing the needs of families and carers. It gives particular attention to the development of family support groups. It also offers information about resources available to agencies, service providers and family support groups.

This document talk about domestic violence and how it affects children. Domestic violence can happen in any family and in all kinds of homes. In half of the cases of violence between adults, children get hurt too. Even when children do not see the violence happening, they often hear it. Children are often in the same or next room when the violence is going on. This can be extremely distressing and disturbing for them.

SNIP provides advice and information on services available to children with additional support needs and their carers.