socioeconomic groups

Paper that looks at how the relation between occupational background, ill health, and economic activity has changed over the period 1973 to 2009, following an approach described in a paper published in the BMJ in 1996.

The research in the original paper was done to understand why falls in unemployment following the peaks of recessions in 1986 and 1990 were not accompanied by equal increases in employment.

What socioeconomic benefits can be attributed to nursing and midwifery with respect to: mental health nursing, long-term conditions, and role substitution? In order to address this question, the EPPI-Centre carried out a Systematic Rapid Evidence Assessment (SREA) involving a focused review of systematic reviews with a limited search. This systematic review was published by EPPI-Centre in 2010 .

This learning object is one of a set of exercises and activities taken from the book 'Modern Social Work Practice' written by Mark Doel and Steven Shardlow. This activity is designed to sensitize students to cultural differences by understanding more about their own cultural inheritance. The student learns that cultural competence is not an absolute quality and that ‘culture’ is not something which is limited to certain groups, classes or races.

Research on public attitudes to inequality has tended to focus more on revealing attitudes than exploring what motivates them. This study aims to fill some of the gaps in existing research to provide useful insights for practitioners and policy-makers.

The current Labour government has made a commitment to abolish child poverty in Britain by 2020. In its efforts to do so, a number of targets have been established and indicators of progress are being reviewed annually. However, tackling severe child poverty does not feature in these targets or indicators. In fact, although there is now a wealth of information about child poverty in Britain, very little is known about either the extent of severe child poverty or the children who are affected.

This report notes that there is an incomplete picture of family life in Britain. The scale of the contribution that the UK's 14 million grandparents are making is not fully known. This interim report uses new British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey data to begin to build a more comprehensive picture of Britain's grandparent population; looking at how it has changed over the last decade, and what financial implications becoming a grandparent might involve.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. In recent years there has been growing concern within the Irish community, Mind and other agencies and professionals working in the mental health field about the mental health of Irish people in Britain. This factsheet aims to give an overview of how the mental health of the Irish community is negatively affected by many factors, including racism.

This feasibility study was conducted to establish the potential for a research study of child poverty and ethnicity in the United Kingdom. It explored data sources that could be analysed by ethnic group and the questions relating to child poverty and ethnicity that they might answer. This was used as a basis on which to agree the coverage of the main stage report on ethnicity and child poverty (Research Report no. 576 due to be published in May 2009).

Reviews recent literature on how early years experiences may impact on life chances for different groups of the population. Life chances can cover a range of opportunities that people can experience as they become adults and into their later life. These opportunities include, for example, the likelihood of being in employment over individuals’ lifetimes, the chances of obtaining educational qualifications and the chances of good physical and mental health.

This report documents key findings from analysis of stakeholder feedback and responses to 'Delivering digital inclusion: an action plan for consultation'. It explores what stakeholders perceive to be the core factors shaping successful delivery of the digital inclusion agenda: citizen focus not technology focus; strong leadership; national approach, local delivery; benchmarking, timeframes and measurable outcomes; sustainable, long term funding and planning.