groups

Research on public attitudes to inequality has tended to focus more on revealing attitudes than exploring what motivates them. This study aims to fill some of the gaps in existing research to provide useful insights for practitioners and policy-makers.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on gangs and looks at what happens when a violent gang tries to refashion itself as a political movement. David Brotherton, Associate Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is co-author of 'The Almighty Latin King and Queen Nation: Street Politics and the Transformation of a New York City Gang', an account of his experience of the notorious New York branch of an American super gang and its decision to go straight. He joins Laurie Taylor to discuss. The segment is first in the audio clip.

The first programme in the series looks at the American social psychologist Solomon Asch and his studies on conformity in the 1950s. Claudia Hammond investigates the reasons for conformity and asks whether we're more or less likely to conform today.

This government strategy, developed in partnership with the Housing Community Network, sets out how residents, along with their community associations, can get involved in developing their local services to improve their quality of life. The Strategy briefly discusses different models and methods of involvement. An "Action Plan" which outlines key themes and priorities for the next three years is also included.

Reviews recent literature on how early years experiences may impact on life chances for different groups of the population. Life chances can cover a range of opportunities that people can experience as they become adults and into their later life. These opportunities include, for example, the likelihood of being in employment over individuals’ lifetimes, the chances of obtaining educational qualifications and the chances of good physical and mental health.

In a contribution to the JRF's 'social evils' series, Chris Creegan focuses on the social evils of British society experienced by people whose voices are not usually heard. The research used workshops/discussion groups with lone parents, ex-offenders, unemployed and other vulnerable and socially excluded people to explore their personal experiences of living and coping with social evils. Suggestions for overcoming them point to both individual and collective responsibility.

This report asks what a focus on severe child poverty adds to our understanding of child poverty and what it may suggest in terms of future strategic approaches and policy solutions With the government committed to their goal of ending child poverty by 2020 there are concerns that policy has not reached those families in the most severe poverty.

This episode of Radio 4's Thinking Allowed series includes a segment on the history of the housewife. Laurie Taylor talks to Dr Justine Lloyd, Visiting Fellow in the School of Sociology at the University of Lancaster and co-author of 'Sentenced to Everyday Life - Feminism and the Housewife' which examines the history of the housewife in the 1940's and 1950's, and asks whether she was really more of a feminist than we might think. The segment is second in the audio clip after a discussion on cricket.

This report examines the extent to which work can contribute to the eradication of child poverty, and identifies a number of issues that necessarily arise if work is seen as the best route out of poverty. The government has repeatedly stated that work is the best route out of poverty. This implies that work is not the only route, but is the preferred or main route in tackling child poverty. This report examines the extent to which there is underemployment among parents and a desire to work among parents who are not currently working.

Bullying does not only happen in normal school hours, it can happen anywhere. Children who are badly bullied in school are more likely than others to be bullied outside of it too. This guidance is aimed at managers, staff and volunteers in youth activities, clubs and groups – including local authority and third sector providers, and voluntary management committees. It outlines the possible bullying that might occur in youth activities and describes steps to prevent it and respond to it effectively.