disabled people

The national review of services for disabled children was undertaken jointly by Scottish Government, the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (COSLA) and the For Scotland‟s Disabled Children (fSDC) Liaison Project to provide a strategic assessment of the children's disability landscape.

The report and its accompanying plan for action mark the first stage in a longer process; the next stage is the implementation by all relevant partners of actions flowing from the report.

A disability interactive e-learning resource created to support people achieve outcomes for children.

The Disability Equality Duty has now been in place for four years. It provides a framework for promoting equality, addressing disability discrimination and tackling the barriers and prejudice that disabled people experience. This report demonstrates the progress we are making in our journey towards full disability equality.

One of a series of reports providing the social services workforce with brief, accessible and practice-oriented summaries of published evidence on key topics.

Developed through a process of rapid appraisal, Insights seek to highlight the practice implications of research evidence and answer the 'So what does this mean in practice?' question for each topic reviewed.

This Insight looks at the evidence around effectively involving those in seldom-heard groups.

Counting the Costs 2010 was a survey carried out between February and April 2010 and completed by 1,113 UK respondents. All respondents are parents of disabled children. It comprises open and closed questions and is s a repeat of a survey carried out by Contact a Family in 2008. Additional questions were added to the 2010 survey on the benefits system, working and childcare.

The current Gender Equality Duty requires Scottish Ministers to set out priority areas that they have identified across the functions and activities relevant to Scottish public authorities and then provide an overview of progress in these priority areas by 1 July 2010. Scottish Ministers agreed two priority areas, namely: tackling violence against women and occupational segregation. This paper presents the main findings of a review of key evidence and national policies relating to tackling violence against women.

There are widespread assumptions about the potentially beneficial impact of short breaks on family carers and disabled children, including reduced carer stress and an increased capacity for family carers to continue caring, and increased child enjoyment of a wider range of social opportunities. This review aims to systematically evaluate the existing international research evidence concerning the impact of short breaks, to determine where there is robust evidence for the impact of short breaks on families with a disabled child and where more evidence is needed.

Website resource with links to a range of publications on various subjects, including advocacy, sexuality and relationships, disabled children, personalisation and direct payments, and finance.

Kirstein Rummery, Chair of the Social Policy at the University of Stirling, speaks about personalisation and some of the issues involved. The talk was delivered at the Personalisation and Community Capacity, a joint seminar and workshop by the Perth and Kinross Council and University of Stirling Partnership. It was held at the University of Stirling on 4 December 2009.