communities

Context matters: artist residencies

Case study which is the third in a series of five which will explore key strands of the Arts and Social Change programme within Citizen Power Peterborough.

Citizen Power Peterborough is a two-year programme of action supported by Peterborough City Council, the Royal Society of Arts and Arts Council England. The aim is to build connections between people and communities, get people more involved in public life 
and encourage active citizenship.

Experiments in pace making

Case study which is the first in a series of five which will explore key strands of the Arts and Social Change programme within Citizen Power Peterborough.

Citizen Power Peterborough is a two-year programme of action supported by Peterborough City Council, the Royal Society of Arts and Arts Council England. The aim is to build connections between people and communities, get people more involved in public life and encourage active citizenship.

Creative gathering: more purposeful together

Second in a series of five case studies which explore key strands of the Arts and Social Change programme within Citizen Power Peterborough. It focuses on 'creative gatherings' as a way to connect people and communities.

Theatre Nemo

Isabel McCue was inspired to set up Theatre Nemo following her son John's eight year battle with mental ill-health. Its mission is to empower people affected by mental ill-health to have better, more fulfilled lives through the creative arts. 

The organisation runs projects in communities, prisons and hospitals.

Building dementia-friendly communities: a priority for everyone

Report that provides evidence on dementia-friendly communities from the perspective of people affected by dementia and their carers. It explores the barriers that people face in their community, how they would like to be engaged with their local area and the support they need to do so.

It also collates existing evidence and describes projects that are already making a difference for people with dementia. This information is used both to provide a definition of a dementia-friendly community, and to lay out 10 areas of focus for communities working to become dementia friendly.

Neighbourhood community budget pilot programme: research, learning, evaluation and lessons

The Neighbourhood Community Budget pilot programme ran from April 2012 to March 2013. This report documents the learning from the programme and summarises the operational plans submitted at the end of the pilot process. It then reflects on the key messages which were generated from this exercise. 

Understanding the place based social value created by new-start social enterprises: evidence from ten rural communities

Social enterprise, characterised by organisations enacting a hybrid mix of non-profit and for-profit characteristics, is increasingly regarded as an important component in the regeneration of areas affected by social and economic deprivation. In parallel there has been growing academic, practitioner and policy interest in 'social value' and 'social impact' within the broader 'social economy'.

Improving community planning in Scotland

Report designed to make a constructive contribution to the debate about how community planning in Scotland can, and should, be improved.

It does not seek to provide ‘the answer’ to resolving all of the challenges that community planning in Scotland faces. Rather, it uses collective experience of auditing community planning and partnership working to contribute towards how community planning in Scotland can be improved. 

Seeing and doing: learning, resources and social networks below the radar

Working paper based on a series of pilot interviews with 15 community groups that began their activities as informal or ‘below the radar’ community organisations, aims to explore:

Co-production of health and wellbeing in Scotland

In Scotland co-production is no longer just a ‘nice idea’ but a necessity to deal with increasing health inequalities (Sir Harry Burns) and changing demographics and expectations (Gerry Power).

This book shows how and why Scotland has become one of the leaders in public service co-production – and how the lessons learnt so far can be applied more widely.