black and minority ethnic people

Paper advocating some first steps in reforming primary care in prisons in England so that the UK Government's policy of 'equivalence', whereby prisoners receive health care in prison which is equivalent to that they would receive outside, can be better achieved.

This podcast was recorded at the 'Forgotton Citizens' Conference, held in Glasgow on the 17th June 2008. Furrah Arshad introduces the work of the organisation Ethnic Enable and its origins. She talks through some of the major issues affecting people with learning disabilities from black and minority ethnic communities in Scotland and also shares her thoughts on how best to make connections with families from black and minority ethnic communities. Tahira Ramzan is a young Asian woman with learning disabilities and she shares her experiences and hopes for her future.

Mind is a leading mental health charity in England and Wales and has produced information on many areas of mental health. This factsheet is targeted at mental health professionals, journalists and students. However, it is also aims to present mental health statistics in a way which makes the subject accessible to all those who are interested in mental health.

Stigmatisation and discrimination are not new to migrant communities, and the AIDS epidemic has played into and reinforced existing racism and xenophobia. This factsheet looks at the way ethnic and racial groups are often perceived and judged as a group, rather than as individuals. They are stereotyped as being 'aggressive', 'unqualified', 'uneducated', or 'criminal'. There is abundant evidence to refute each of these stereotypes.

This paper is about the HIV epidemic in the context of black Africans in England. It focuses on black African communities because they are disproportionately affected by HIV compared to other minority ethnic groups. It gives an overview of the current epidemiological status, HIV support and prevention needs and recommendations for policy and practice. The paper notes that the majority of black Africans are tested for HIV very late and are unable to benefit fully form available treatment and care. The impact of socio-economic factors is also discussed.

This resource offers general useful advice on the diversity between different cultures and religions. It focuses on the ways in which different cultures think about issues such as personal care, family planning, childbirth, medical intervention, as well as death and dying.

Participation is on everyone's agenda at the moment, and statutory agencies are conscious of the need to hear a wide range of voices. Some voices, however, are more powerful than others. This research project carried out in Bradford supports the view that statutory agencies do not adequately hear minority voices within groups such as the South Asian community.

This conference report examines the issues relating to making advocacy more accessible for everyone. Specifically, the report looks at what can be done to promote diversity and inclusion, the importance of advocacy for people with dementia, what children and young people want from advocacy, and the advocacy needs of deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing people.

This study aimed to investigate the differences between ethnic groups in their contact with child welfare services in England. Analyses were conducted on three national datasets (the Children in Need Census, children on the child protection register and children looked after), and looked after children’s care histories were examined to see if over- or under-representation could be explained by factors such as differing rates of entering or leaving care. These analyses were supplemented by a review of relevant research literature.

Grampian Racial Equality Council was established in the mid-1980s to tackle discrimination as defined by, and within the confines of, the Race Relations Act 1976, soon to be strengthened and complemented by the forthcoming Race Relations Act (Amendment) Bill and the Human Rights Act 1998. Although the Grampian Racial Equality Council is an autonomous, voluntary sector, organisation they work in partnership with the government body, the Commission for Racial Equality.